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4 results for The State Vol. 29 Issue 16, Jan 1962
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Record #:
12744
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Abstract:
Huskins makes the claim \"Gliberals\" who write columns and editorials are now trying to place a ceiling on patriotism in America. No longer content to stress the value of moderation and conformity, liberals have adopted a new technique, emphasizing the dangers of becoming either an active anti-communist or a militant patriot. The message sent illustrating it is alright to be moderately patriotic on such occasions as July 4 and Veterans Day, but extreme if one is a full blown patriot every day of the year.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 16, Jan 1962, p13
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Record #:
12742
Abstract:
The thriving mining city of Spruce Pine, in Mitchell County, took its name from a giant tree that stands at the forks of the town road. Many important events have taken place in the immediate vicinity of the huge spruce pine, including the Civil War story of Isaac English and Col. J. M. Gear. English was a Union sympathizer who encountered Union Col. Gear while walking through town, and helped the sickly Colonel to safety.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 16, Jan 1962, p11, 20, il
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Record #:
12743
Author(s):
Abstract:
Measured by a variety of standards of accomplishment and service to the State, Hugh McRae Morton of Wilmington and Linville has been named the North Carolinian of 1961. Best known for his leadership in the successful campaign to bring the USS NORTH CAROLINA home, Morton originated the idea of establishing the vessel as a floating museum. As authorized by the Assembly, Governor Sanford named a Battleship Commission, with Morton as head chairman, raising over $500,000 for the saving of the battleship.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 16, Jan 1962, p9, 25, por
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Record #:
12745
Abstract:
Zebulon Baird Vance, \"war governor\" from 1862-1865, was likely the most popular and beloved chief executive in all of North Carolina history. The Confederate policy of impressing private property for military uses provoked bitter protest between Vance and Confederate President Davis. Though a critic of Davis and the Confederate government, his policy was to \"fight the Yankees and fuss with the Confederacy.\"
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 29 Issue 16, Jan 1962, p10, 29, il
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