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14 results for The State Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948
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Record #:
14064
Abstract:
Local law enforcement raided a still in the woods near Rowland, Robeson County. An officer was shot by one of the moonshiners, which halted the raid in favor of getting the man to a hospital. The story took a bizarre twist when law enforcement officers returned to the scene the next morning to find the moonshiner had not fled but was instead sitting on a log dead, having been shot in the head. Investigations revealed the moonshiner's rifle shot triggered the officer's revolver despite the deputy never pulling the trigger; an uncanny story later aired on the radio show \"Ripley's Believe-It-Or-Not.\"
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p15, il
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Record #:
14068
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In the State vs. William Hall and John Dockery, two North Carolina men from Cherokee County were convicted of murder and the case ended up in North Carolina Supreme Court. The defendants' lawyer argued that the crime actually took place in Tennessee, not North Carolina, thus negating the court's jurisdiction. The North Carolina Supreme Court ruled in favor of defendants because at that time there were no laws that covered that case. Later, the state legislature passed a law to close the loophole revealed by this 1894 murder case.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p30-31
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Record #:
14069
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Colin Lindsay was born in Scotland under bizarre conditions. His mother was laid to rest prematurely in the family vault and was discovered alive only after a drunken man was dared to enter the vault so soon after interring the 'deceased.' A couple of years later, Colin Lindsay was born after his mother recovered from near death. He became a Presbyterian preacher and in 1792, after arriving in America, started as a preacher at Black River Church in Sampson County. His career as a preacher also took him to congregations in Raft Swamp Church, Robeson County and Bethel Church, Upper Robeson.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p33
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Record #:
14067
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The article serves as a brief introduction into historic North Carolina town names and how their names changed. Commonly, town names were chosen for an influential individual in North Carolina culture or a city's industry. For example, Wilmington, a shipping town, had its name transformed from New Liverpool, New Town, Newton, and finally Wilmington.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p28-29
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Record #:
14063
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This article is a commemoration of the first issue of The State, which was published fifteen years ago. Goerch recounts events leading to publication of The State, which include early radio work, the investors involved, and ideas about the direction of The State. The author also describes the logistics of running the magazine as well as the staff and writers contributing material to The State.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p5-6, 70, il
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Record #:
14066
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In this short tale concerning a chance meeting in Pittsburgh where a doctor and an old woman discover they are both from North Carolina. Meeting on the street, they discuss their home town of Henderson, its virtues, and North Carolina in general, expressing their pride for the state and regrets for ever leaving.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p19
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Record #:
14065
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Based on a letter written to The State, this article includes population totals for North Carolina counties in 1790. There is a brief political discussion about how many counties North Carolina should have and counties added since 1790.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p16
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Record #:
14073
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Mary Slocumb ran to her husband in battle after believing she dreamed he cried out for her. At the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge during the Revolutionary War, Colonel Slocumb was engaged with British troops. His wife Mary believed she heard him call to her while she slept and decided to make a daring run to Moore's Creek from Goldsboro a sixty mile journey. Most of the article is a reprint of Mary Slocumb's own description of events, ending with the author mentioning the internment of Colonel Slocumb and his wife at Moore's Creek National Park.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p41-42, il
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Record #:
14074
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This article is about the most historic towns in North Carolina with the author focusing on those places along the coast before the development of roads further inland. He lists the following towns, followed by the county they are located; Manteo, New Bern, Bath, Wilmington, Edenton, Fayetteville, Hillsboro, Salem, Raleigh.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p43-45
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Record #:
14071
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The story of Frances Silver is retold along with a reprint of a ballad composed by Silver while in jail for murder. Silver lived near Burke with her husband and child, and while her husband lay sleeping on the floor, she used an ax to murder him, burning his body to hide the evidence. Silver was convicted and hanged on July 12, 1833.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p36-37
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Record #:
14070
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Reprinted from an earlier issue, a hitchhiking soldier is trying to catch a ride to his hometown between Lumberton and Pembroke. The driver, presumably Caucasian, has a conversation with his passenger, a Native American enlisted in the Army. The narrator's presumptions about Native American culture and traits are discussed.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p34-35
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Record #:
14072
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This article provides a brief description or certain mandates passed by the University of North Carolina Board of Trustees. This article makes reference to the strictness of these laws as a way for the administration to control the student body, many of which were no longer enforced in 1948.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p39
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Record #:
14076
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This article discusses early cotton mills and minting coins. Lincoln County was the site of the first cotton mill established in 1813. Coincidentally, Lincoln County was also the location of some of the first gold minting in North Carolina, beginning around 1832. The author lists names and locations of other prominent mills and mining operations in North Carolina.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p54-55, 59
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Record #:
14075
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The first football bouts played in North Carolina happened during Fair Week in Raleigh in 1888. Three colleges, University of North Carolina, Trinity College, and Wake Forest College fumbled through several games, with no one really understanding the game. The article includes rosters and statistics for each game, followed by personal remembrances.
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The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p48-50
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