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11 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1,
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Record #:
36500
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the problems of desegregation in North Carolina. There was also the problem of Indian schools. African American communities, who first supported the desegregation of schools, later began to segregate themselves by choice.
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Record #:
36501
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author wrote a tender essay about a child’s view of being a witness to the Greensboro Sit-in at Woolworth's lunch counter.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p11-12, il
Record #:
36515
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about the ethnic problems of Robeson County, NC and the formation of the Center for Community Action in 1980. They brought everyone together, identified the major social –change needs and worked for years to make Robeson County a better place.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p34-37, il
Record #:
36512
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the death of Golden A. Frinks, the author honors the legacy of his civil rights community work in eastern North Carolina. A poignant speech Mr. Frinks gave in the 1970’s is given touching the many turbulent and tragic incidents from the Civil Rights movement.
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Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p28-30, il
Record #:
36503
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author discusses the former practice where white people in towns got to vote for members of their city school system and also got to vote for the members of the county school system. That vote diluted the vote from the county citizens; which led to white men from towns running the county schools.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p13-14, il
Record #:
36498
Abstract:
The author gives a detailed history of politics in North Carolina, a timeline of legal actions, changing issues and the struggle for civil rights.
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Record #:
36507
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author shares her journey of being a vocal music teacher at John W. Ligon High School in Raleigh, NC, creating different music classes, doing music drama, and creating the Ligon Jubilee Singers. She remembers the violence after the shooting of Dr. Martin Luther King, gives her early work in the Civil Rights movement and shares the music she composed after the death of Dr. King.
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Record #:
36511
Abstract:
The author talks about the motivations of the four black men who performed the sit-in at Woolworth's lunch counter in Greensboro, NC and growing non-violent movement for justice and civil rights that came after.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p28-30, il
Record #:
36510
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author remembers the KKK coming to Maxton, NC in 1958 and how the Indians broke up the rally.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p25-27, il
Record #:
36506
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author talks about her early life in Murfreesboro, NC, joining VISTA and the work she did in the community amidst racial tension.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. Vol. 44 Issue No. 1, , p15-17, il