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4 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 2003
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Record #:
7073
Abstract:
The Tar Heel Junior History Association is celebrating its fiftieth anniversary in 2003. During its history the association has played a leading role in promoting the study of state and local history in the schools. The authors discuss some of the association's landmarks over the past fifty years, including the General Assembly's passing legislation ( Bill #207) establishing the association in April 1953, the start of the TAR HEEL JUNIOR HISTORIAN magazine in 1963, and the opening of a gallery in 1995 in the North Carolina Museum of History to showcase award-winning student projects.
Source:
Record #:
7076
Author(s):
Abstract:
Whatever state they are located in, junior historian organizations all share a common purpose, and that is to stress the idea that events that happen at home are just as important and history-making as those that happen elsewhere. The first junior historical society was organized in Indiana in 1938 and soon spread to other states, including Texas and New York. In North Carolina the idea was first discussed in 1946. Lewis discusses the work of historians, educators, and legislators that culminated in the passage of an act establishing the Tar Heel Junior Historian Association in 1953.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p12-15, il, por
Record #:
7075
Author(s):
Abstract:
Lewis profiles three of the founders of the Tar Heel Junior History Association: William H. Cartwright, Joye E. Jordan, and Charles Crittenden.
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Record #:
7074
Author(s):
Abstract:
Freeze compares life in North Carolina in 1953 to what it is like in 2003. For example, in 1953, most of the population lived in the country or in small towns of less than 1,000 residents. Many areas lacked electrical service. The electronic world of today was just a dream. Nor were there huge malls or stores on the bypasses. The greatest social change has been the end to racial segregation, and politically, the Republicans are now the dominant party. One thing remains constant, however; it's still 543 miles from Manteo to Murphy.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 42 Issue 2, Spring 2003, p4-7, il, map