NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


6 results for Tar Heel Junior Historian Vol. 34 Issue 1, Fall 1994
Currently viewing results 1 - 6
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
2008
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1900 and 1960 the automobile significantly changed recreation in North Carolina by making travel cheaper and easier, recreation sites more accessible, and support businesses, such as gift shops and restaurants, more widespread.
Source:
Record #:
2009
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chapel Hill native Estelle Lawson Page never took formal golfing lessons, yet six years after learning the game she was one of America's top women golfers.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 34 Issue 1, Fall 1994, p13-16, il
Record #:
2007
Author(s):
Abstract:
Such recreational activities as marbles, cards, dancing, swimming, and fishing enabled slaves in North Carolina to mitigate the difficulties and harshness of their lives in ways that were neither violent nor competitive.
Source:
Record #:
2010
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early 1950s, Eckie Jordan and Eunie Futch were key players on Winston-Salem's Hanes Hosiery women's basketball team, which won 102 straight games and three national AAU championships.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 34 Issue 1, Fall 1994, p17-20, il
Record #:
2006
Author(s):
Abstract:
Colonial North Carolina's scattered rural population played games that were individualized or for small groups; among these were marbles, dolls, whittling, leapfrog, cards, hide-and-seek, and hopscotch.
Source:
Record #:
2039
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Sports Hall of Fame, which is housed in the North Carolina Museum of History, honors the state's most important sports figures.
Source:
Tar Heel Junior Historian (NoCar F 251 T3x), Vol. 34 Issue 1, Fall 1994, p33-36, il