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14 results for Our State Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013
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Record #:
19470
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Sean Ruttkay's photography is life-size and captures those rare moments such as being in the pipe of a breaking wave or the instant a sea turtle breaks the surface to breathe. His photographs range from 2 feet by 3 feet to 8 feet by 12 feet. His pieces are shot in close proximity, usually within 12 inches. Since graduating from UNC-Wilmington he has sold over 1,000 pieces of his work.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p28, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19462
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Carthage, the county seat of Moore County, is featured in Our State Magazine's Tar Heel Town of the Month section. Among the things not to miss are Moore Coffee Shop, the Buggy Festival, Ederville, Highlanders Farm, and the Carthage Historical Museum. Carthage at one time was the buggy-manufacturing capital, and in its peak year, 1890, the factory turned out over three thousand luxury buggies.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p32-34, 36, 38, 40-42 Periodical Website
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Record #:
19469
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Junek relates how the Happy Valley Pals, a Chapel Hill-based band, works to preserve traditional Piedmont music. The string band players have been together twenty years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p19-21, il, por Periodical Website
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19471
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This Bar-B-Cue place in Granite Falls is only open on Friday and Saturday evenings. Keith Sims, now 83 years old, started the place in 1979. The restaurant is a 5,500-square-foot building. Each weekend about 300 to 350 pounds of beef, 350 pounds to 400 pounds of pork, and 140 whole chickens are served. Hundreds of people wait in line to be served, and one night over 1,000 customers passed through the buffet. After the bar-b-cue is served, topnotch bluegrass bands perform.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p69-70, 72, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
19472
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The Battery Park Book Exchange is an eclectic bookstore located in Asheville's Grove Arcade. Customers can enjoy wine, champagne, coffee, or snacks as they wander through the 30,000-volume bookstore. Thomas Wright, who had a long career in industrial chemical manufacturing and restaurant management, wanted to do something different, and in 2004 he bought a bookstore in Little Switzerland. In 2009 he opened his present store in the Battery Park Hotel and in 2011 moved it to its current location.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p76-78, 80-82, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19498
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Photographer Chaplin explores Bald Head Island in this pictorial essay. It is a small barrier island, two miles wide and three miles long, located at the southern end of the state. Through the help of conservationists 10,000 of the island's 12,000 acres are not in a state-supported protective easement. There are around 220 full-time residents on the island. Automobiles are not permitted.
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Record #:
19508
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Kruse recounts the lives of nineteen families who located in the 1970s to a raw barrier island, called Bald Head Island. They constructed their own homes on an island that had no marina, electricity, restaurants, stores, country clubs, swimming pools, or telephones. Their approach to living on and conserving the island continues to this day.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p114-116, 118, 120-122, 124, 126-128, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19533
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Jacob Nathaniel Raymer was a Catawba County native who joined Company C of the 4th North Carolina Infantry when the state seceded from the Union on June 7, 1861. An observant individual and insatiable writer, Raymer sends detailed letters home to his local newspaper throughout the war making him one of hundreds of war correspondents. The article reviews the role of these war correspondents for both sides and how news was disseminated during the Civil War.
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19532
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Where the Wright Brothers once flew, hang gliders now soar from Jockey's Ridge on the Outer Banks. In all began in 1974 when John Harris opened Kitty Hawk Kites in the garage of the old Nags Head Casino. Now, forty-one years later, there are fifteen retail stores along the state's coastline with plans to open more across the Southeast. Besides the flying school at Nags Head, he has another in New Hampshire, and he has taught over half a million people how to fly.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p160-164, 166, 168-171, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19531
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Captain Ernie Foster's father, Captain Ernal Foster, started the first charter boat business on North Carolina's Outer Banks in 1937. Locals laughed at him at first and wondered how such an undertaking could be successful; yet, over the years his business grew and prospered. Captain Ernie is probably the last captain in the original family. Sports fishing, however, is a big competitor of commercial fishing, and Captain Ernie works to keep his family fleet that fishes for fun.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p130-134, 136-138, 140, 142-144, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19560
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The swing bridge that connects the mainland to Topsail Island has left fond memories in the minds of those who have crossed it. A pontoon bridge was used in the 1940s and early 50s. The bridge opened in 1955, and it brought delays when boats were passing through. It also opened the island to development. Now plans are underway to replace it with a 65-foot arch over the Intercoastal Waterway. The article includes memories of the bridge from people who have used it through the years.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p172-176, 178, 180-182, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19559
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Karen Amspacher works to preserve Harkers Island's heritage. She has, among other activities, served as editor of the newsletter THE MAILBOAT, head of the Core Sound Decoy Museum, cookbook compiler, and fundraiser for the new decoy museum building.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p146-148, 150, 152, 154, 156, 158, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19592
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When dining out, most people understand that the food is produced on farms and that the restaurants then prepare it for your dining experience. The step they don't think about is the middle one--the people who deal with the food before it reaches the restaurant from the farm. Hughes recounts the history of Southern Foods, a Greensboro-based family-owned business that for almost sixty years has been delivering the best meats, cheeses, and chocolates to restaurants.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p218-220, 222, 224, 226, 228, 230, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
19593
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Davis describes the 10-acre The Elizabethan Garden on Roanoke Island. The garden is located on the Fort Raleigh National Historic Site--the place where an English colony vanished over 400 years ago. In 1950 a group of influential women who were visiting the site decided that a garden should be planted there. In 1951, they asked the Garden Club of North Carolina to help create the garden, and ten years later, on August 18, 1960, the garden opened.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 12, May 2013, p251-252, 254, 256, 258, il Periodical Website
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