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18 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005
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Record #:
7453
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The bald cypress tree, while not a true cypress, has played a part in North Carolina history for over 4,500 years. The tree grows in wet, swampy areas, often in standing water. At Phelps Lake in Washington County 30 dugout canoes made of bald cypress by Native Americans were found; the oldest canoe dates back to around 2430 B.C. The bald cypress was popular with colonists, who used it in ship building, fence making, and other types of construction. The greatest use of the tree was in making house shingles. At the start of the Civil War, a company, founded in the Dismal Swamp by George Washington, was shipping a million and a half shingles a year. Logging felled most of the state's old-growth bald cypress trees during the 19th- and early 20th-centuries, though some remain in out-of-the-way swamps. One tree in Three Sisters Swamp in Pender County is 1,600 years old, making it the oldest documented living thing in the eastern United States.
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Record #:
7450
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Marion, county seat of McDowell County, is OUR STATE magazine's Tar Heel town of the month. The town is located near major highways, which allows residents to enjoy the charm of a small town and still have easy access to the amenities of larger towns like Asheville and Hickory. Preservation is important in the downtown area with a number of buildings refurbished for modern-day uses. Marion is home to several structures on the National Register of Historic Places, including the McDowell County Courthouse. For the past nineteen years the Appalachian Potters Market, which brings sixty artisans from the Southeastern United States, has been a major tourist draw.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p18-20, 22, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7452
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Americans are great collectors of all kinds of items. Dr. Manny Rothstein, a Fayetteville dermatologist, has one of the more unique collections. Given a back scratcher as a promotional item in 1975, he began to acquire more on his own. Today he has nearly 600 back scratchers in his still-growing collection, and according to the Guinness Book of World Records, the collection is the largest in the world.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p29-31, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7451
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In 1874, residents in the vicinity of Bald Mountain in Rutherford County reported feeling the ground shake, hearing loud booms, and seeing smoke and vapors coming from the mountain. Word spread, and soon newspaper correspondents from Raleigh to New York were arriving to see the volcano. Horan recounts the story of North Carolina's 19th-century “volcano.”
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Record #:
7463
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Starting in 1926, W. C. Page, Sr., and Arthur Presnell manufactured rocking chairs in Asheboro. The P&P Chair Company still occupies the original factory buildings. Presnell sold his share to his partner in the 1930s. The company experienced economic up-and-downs, and in the 1950s, the owners contemplated closing. Dr. Janet Travell, a back specialist, liked the chair and ordered several for her waiting room. When she placed her order, she asked for the Carolina Rocker, and the name stuck. One of her patients, a U.S. Senator, sat in one, and just had to have one for his office. When the senator moved to the White House in January 1961, the rocker went with him. The Carolina Rocker quickly became the Kennedy Rocker, and company sales took off.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p44-48, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7464
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The North Carolina Main Street Program, a part of the Department of Commerce's Division of Community Assistance, is celebrating its twenty-fifth anniversary in 2005. North Carolina was one of the six original states to participate in the program. Since 1980, fifty-three towns across the state have signed up. The program promotes preservation and economic development in downtown areas. Caldwell profiles several program participants, Edenton, New Bern, Salisbury, Shelby, and Waynesville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p86-92, 94-95, il Periodical Website
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7465
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The Pitt County Courthouse was built in Greenville in 1910. The courthouse, designed in the neo-Classical Revival style, is the fifth in the county's history. It is one of eleven North Carolina courthouses designed by the Washington, D.C., architectural firm of Milburn and Heister. By 1997, the courthouse was in a state of disrepair, and there was a movement to build a new one on the north side of the Tar River in the county government complex. Bradsher describes the seven-year, $17 million renovation of the courthouse.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p98-100, 102-103, il Periodical Website
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7466
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At the North Carolina Museum of Art in Raleigh is one of the only art-nature trails in the country. The trail, which opened in 2005, is dotted with art inspired by the natural world such as a giant brambly structure by Patrick Dougherty and a whirligig by Vollis Simpson. The two-mile trail ends in a pedestrian stone bridge over the Raleigh Beltline that connects it with miles of Raleigh greenway trails.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p104-106, 108, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7471
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Reevy recounts the history of one of the shortest rail lines in the country. The short-run Carrboro Branch line between Chapel Hill and Carrboro has served its unique purpose for more than a century. Incorporated in 1873 as the Chapel Hill Iron Mountain Railroad Company, the ten-mile railroad was to serve an iron mine. Construction of the road began in 1879, but the company soon ran out of money. The mine was never a success, and ownership passed through several large railroad companies. Today, the line carries coal to the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill's Cogeneration Facility three times a week as well as other freight for the area. About the mid-20th-century, Carrboro native and folksinger, Elizabeth “Libba” Cotton wrote a famous song, called “Freight Train,” about the Carrboro train as she knew it.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p148-150, 152-153, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7469
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Over thirty years ago Sol Rose purchased thirty acres on the east bank of the Cape Fear River in Fayetteville. Now semi-retired from the surveying business he founded after graduating from North Carolina State University in 1951, Rose has plans for the area he calls Campbellton Landing. He built an amphitheater in 2004 and has plans for a restaurant and shops. The restaurant would be a pub-type, and the shops would sell outdoor merchandise for activities like archery, canoeing, and kayaking. Rose has discovered many historical facts about his property, such as Peter Lord receiving a franchise from the King of England in 1764 to operate a public ferry there.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p132-134, 136, 138, il Periodical Website
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7472
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Westbrook describes Duke University's new art museum, the Nasher Museum of Art, opened in October 2005. Formerly, the Duke University Museum of Art was located in what was once a science building. The museum takes its new name from its major benefactor, Raymond D. Nasher, a 1943 Duke alumnus. Uruguayan-born architect Rafael Vinoly designed the museum. The Nashers collected modern American and pre-Columbian art. Their 20th-century modern sculpture collection is one of the world's most extensive and significant private collections, and part of their collection is currently on exhibit. The 65,000-square-foot museum features 14,000 square feet of exhibit space, a cafe, a museum shop, and classrooms.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p154-156, 158, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7473
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At the beginning of the 20th-century, African American businessmen in Durham developed a business district to provide economic assistance and opportunities to the African American community. The area, which came to be known as the Black Wall Street, was located in downtown Durham on Parrish Street. A number of businesses flourished there, including the N.C. Mutual Life Insurance Company (1898) and Mechanics & Farmers Bank (1907), as well as a drugstore, tailor, barber, and beauty shops, clothing stores, and law offices. Plans to commemorate the street's local and national significance and rejuvenate the historic structures located there are underway.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p170-172, 174, 176, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7467
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Volunteer efforts are restoring the long-forgotten Jackson County Cemetery with gravesites dating back to 1870. The work began 20 years ago when the county proposed clearing the land for a recreation center. The volunteers invoked an early 20th-century law passed in the General Assembly that makes it illegal to desecrate a cemetery, no matter how old. Originally a pauper cemetery, the site is believed to be the final resting place of Native Americans, slaves, and one Confederate soldier. The volunteers have organized the Jackson County Cemetery Society to continue restoration work at other historic cemeteries in Sylva and Whittier.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p110-113, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7470
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Hodge recounts the history of St. Joseph's Catholic Church, located near Mount Holly in Gaston County. The church was built in 1843 and claims to be the oldest Catholic church building in the state. It is also one of the smallest, being 40 feet long and 30 feet wide. Regular services at the church stopped in the late 19th-century, and at one time the building was used to store hay. Plans for restoration began in 1974, and on November 2, 1975, St. Joseph's was rededicated. In 1979, the church was named a National Historic Site by the U.S. Department of the Interior and the state of North Carolina.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p140-142, 144-145, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7468
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For fifty years on Charlotte's Elizabeth Street, Jimmie's Restaurant, operated by Jimmie Pourlous, was an institution. In 2002, when Central Piedmont Community College purchased the building where the restaurant was located, Pourlous and his family faced the decision of moving or retiring. His sons Chris and George had worked in the restaurant all their lives. They planned a new restaurant, and in 2004, the new Jimmie's Restaurant opened in Mint Hill just thirteen miles away from the original. Timblin recounts the history of the restaurant and compares the old one with the new one.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 6, Nov 2005, p122-124-126, 128-129, il, por Periodical Website
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