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19 results for Horan, Jack
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Record #:
6969
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Decisions made today on the state's environment will affect North Carolina far into the future. In this final section of the three-part series on Horizon 2100, conservationists describe what North Carolina could look like in 2100, if aggressive conservation measures were taken. Four statewide strategies, including mitigating the negative effects of human population growth, are discussed.
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7406
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Hiker and author Allen de Hart of Louisburg is profiled. A history professor emeritus at Louisburg College, de Hart has charted hundreds of routes across North Carolina and several other southern states in eight hiking guidebooks. He is a trail promoter, designer, and builder. He has served on the North Carolina Trails Commission for sixteen years and as project director of the Mountains-to-Sea Trail.
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7451
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In 1874, residents in the vicinity of Bald Mountain in Rutherford County reported feeling the ground shake, hearing loud booms, and seeing smoke and vapors coming from the mountain. Word spread, and soon newspaper correspondents from Raleigh to New York were arriving to see the volcano. Horan recounts the story of North Carolina's 19th-century “volcano.”
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17545
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A blight affecting boxwoods has been discovered in North Carolina and several other Eastern states. The blight defoliates and kills the plant and is recognized by dark spots on leaves. The disease has been traced to some 30,000 seedlings produced by two growers in north-central North Carolina. The blight is an invasive having arrived from Europe or New Zealand through shipping.
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17582
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North Carolina gardeners live in a land of powerful weather systems -- hurricanes, tornadoes, thunderstorms. Horan gives tips on how planting pointers to protect landscapes and prevent damage.
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Record #:
19039
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In December 2012, the federal Bureau of Ocean Management began to look to North Carolina for the leasing on wind farms in federal waters off the state. This first phase will gauge public and industry interests in potential offshore lease areas.
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Record #:
19043
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For years, the Diamond Shoals and Frying Pan Light Towers performed their duties, warning passing ships to steer clear of the Outer Banks of North Carolina. But after being unattended and falling in disrepair, both light towers are getting new missions that include being platforms for ocean research.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2013, p24-27, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
20144
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Whether you are traveling by car or simply cruising the internet, the Outer Banks offers unique ways to visit important cultural, historical, geographical, and environmental features of North Carolina's Outer Banks. The Outer Banks National Scenic Byway connects sea and soundside villages, museums, lighthouses, wildlife refuges, ferries, and the coastal shared heritage. The Outer Banks Maritime Heritage Trail provides a virtual travel experience with videos and oral histories highlighting landmarks on land or under water, along N.C. 12 from Nags Head to Hatteras Inlet.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2013, p6-13, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
21801
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Horan recounts the 60th annual Dixon United Methodist Church Oyster Roast at Varnamtown in Brunswick County. About 158 bushels of Lockwood Folly River oysters were consumed. Horan also traces the oysters route from the river to roast and back again.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 1, Winter 2014, p30-32, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
22156
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Ocean-dwelling American shad have for centuries returned to historic spawning grounds on middle Cape Fear River. However, for the last one hundred years, dams built by the US Army Corps of Engineers on the river from Wilmington to Fayetteville have blocked them. The Cape River Partnership, a coalition of twenty-three state and federal agencies, municipalities, and conservation groups has seen this year the realization this year of some their advocacies. Dam No. 1 now has its own rock arch rapids fishway past the dam, and at Dam No. 2 there is a newly placed spawning habitat of underwater gravel beds. The Partnership hopes that over the next few years Dams 1 and 2 will have their own fishways.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Holiday 2013, p30-34, il, map Periodical Website
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Record #:
23918
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The alligator population in North Carolina is steadily growing, particularly in the southeastern part of the state. Despite recent growth and state laws that prohibit alligator hunting, North Carolina's gator population is still in danger.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 3, Summer 2015, p32-33, il Periodical Website
Record #:
24735
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Since 2005, the annual Johnnie Mercer’s Pier Dogfish Tournament takes place in Wrightsville Beach. Anglers from all over the eastern United States convene at the pier during the last weekend of January in hopes of catching the largest dogfish. It is a relaxed competition and gives summertime anglers the opportunity to reunite during the winter months.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue 5, Holiday 2015, p24-27, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
6841
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DuPont State Forest, comprising 10,268 acres, lies in Henderson and Transylvania Counties twelve miles from Hendersonville. The forest has a car-free policy, and visitors enjoy the lack of traffic. Three spectacular waterfalls, all within a thirty-minute walk, are another appealing feature. Hunting permits are chosen through lottery, and deer, grouse, and turkey are popular game-animals. Camping is not allowed. Mountain bikers and horse riders are permitted on some trails. DuPont Forest attracted 116,000 visitors in 2003.
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Record #:
7068
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North Carolina is one of the top three or four beagling states in the nation. Beagling is a field competition that tests a hound's abilities against other hounds in tracking a scent trail, in this case a rabbit trail. The rabbit always escapes and is never harmed. The state has twenty-four beagling clubs. Horan discusses what a competition involves and the differences between brace beagling and a beagle hunt competition.
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Record #:
8536
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As development intensifies and makes natural areas scarcer, greenways are becoming an indispensable aspect of cities in the state. In some of the state's urban areas, city dwellers who long for the open spaces are getting more miles of nature trails closer to home and work. Horan describes Charlotte's newest trail, the Little Sugar Creek Greenway, which, at fifteen miles in length, will be a major part of the city's total greenway plan.
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