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20 results for Our State Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005
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Record #:
7320
Abstract:
James McConnell Smith built the house with his wife, Mary Patton Smith, around 1840. Smith was one of the region's wealthiest men, owning as much as one-third of Asheville and over 30,000 acres on the French Broad River. The home is the oldest surviving building in Asheville and the oldest brick structure in Buncombe County. It served as a second home for Smith, as the family's main dwelling was in Asheville. The house was later purchased at public auction in 1858, by Smith's daughter, Sarah Lucinda, and her husband William Wallace McDowell. The house was saved from demolition in 1975 by the Western North Carolina Historical Association and the Junior League. The Smith-McDowell house is home to the historical association and serves as a museum.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p76-78, 80, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7321
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A unique program in the state recognizes farm families who have owned their property for over a century. The North Carolina Department of Agriculture and Consumer Services' Century Farm Families program began in 1970 under the leadership of then agriculture commissioner Jim Graham. That year over 800 farms were identified whose owners were able to provide proof of 100 years of continuous ownership. In 2005, the number is around 1,500 farms, with an average of two or three farms joining the program each month. The greatest concentration of Century Farms is in Johnston, Nash, Robeson, Sampson, Duplin, and Alamance Counties. Of North Carolina's 100 counties, only five do not have Century Farms--Dare, Jackson, New Hanover, Swain, and Yancey.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p82-84, 86, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7319
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Carrying a Minolta camera and a North Carolina road map, Mike Lassiter has traveled 30,000 of the state's 52,699 square miles. Lassiter's quest is to preserve family-owned businesses on film before this piece of Americana disappears forever. Many of these businesses are gathering places in small communities; some have operated for a century or more and have become institutions in their towns. Lassiter has traveled the state for the past six years and ended his quest in March 2005. He hopes to publish his collection of photographs and has received some interest from publishing houses.
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Record #:
7315
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Bill Payne, called North Carolina's number one outlaw, and his sidekick, Wash Turner (alias Jack Borden) escaped from the Halifax County's Caledonia prison camp on February 1, 1937. The two went on a crime spree that included car theft, kidnapping, and murder. The pair robbed a number of banks across the state, but it was the robbery the Bank of Candor, in Montgomery County, September 29, 1937, that many people remember. Brought to justice in Sanford by G-Men under the supervision of J. Edgar Hoover, the two were executed in 1938 for murdering a state trooper.
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Record #:
7316
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Born in Harnett County, Jim Swinson grew up in Greenville where he attended East Carolina University. He now lives on Chocowinity Bay. Swinson creates environmentally themed songs that he performs with his wife and son at venues ranging from festivals to elementary schools. His stage name in Pamlico Joe. The songs are designed to help teach children and adults about the importance of caring for the earth and its resources. The family has performed across the state, up and down the East Coast, at the White House, and as far away as Texas.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p30-31, 33, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7318
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In western North Carolina, theater lovers will discover a class-act assortment of small theater companies. Sometimes this means blazing a trail into the wilderness to find the tiny Fletcher Studio Theater (70 seats) at Waynesville. Performances of the familiar and unfamiliar plays can be found from Flat Rock Playhouse, North Carolina's official state theater, to the Licklog Players in Hayesville.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p42-44, 46, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7317
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After World War II, vacationers flocked to the state's beaches. A large part of the credit goes to Bill Sharpe (1903-1970), former publisher of The State magazine, and photographer John H. Hemmer (1892-1981), who promoted travel and tourism in North Carolina. Pittard takes a nostalgic look at beaches the way they were in the post-World War II period.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p36-38, 40, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7328
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Midway Plantation in Knightdale was built on a 1739 land grant from Lord Granville. The property has remained in the Silver family for seven generations. The plantation house sits on what was the old Tarborough Road, which has become a major highway in 2005. Highway I-540 is encroaching nearby. The family decided that the only way to save their 4,000-square-foot home was to move it. Structural engineer for the project is David Fischetti, who supervised relocation of the Cape Hatteras Lighthouse. In 2005, the house will be moved two and a half miles north and relocated on land that passed out of the family in 1830.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p128-132, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7326
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The skipjack ADA MAE was built by Captain Ralph Hodges in Rose Bay, Hyde County, in 1915. Skipjacks, or two-sail bateaus, were dredge boats that supported the state's oyster industry. The ADA MAE is believed to be the only remaining skipjack built in North Carolina. It was found in Baltimore, Maryland, in 1994, by an East Carolina University graduate student who was working on a research project in Maryland. The ADA MAE is moored at Washington, North Carolina, where restoration work is being completed. It will be used there as a classroom to teach students about the oyster industry in the state.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p118-122, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7327
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John McElwrath built the brick house on his Iredell County cotton plantation in 1753, and it is one of the oldest residences still standing in North Carolina. McElwrath died in 1785. Tomlin traces the ownership down to the present owners, Susan and Meredith Hall, who live on the plantation as they restore it. The Halls purchased the property thirty-six years ago and renamed it Darshana Hall Plantation. In 1973, the property was added to the National Register of Historic Places.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p124-127, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
7325
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The Edenton Cotton Mill Village was built in the late 19th-century for the mill's workers. The mill was a principal employer in Edenton, until the late 20th-century. The mill was sold to Unifi Inc. of Greensboro, and closed in 1995. The mill and village have historical significance, and fearing site's loss, state officials were able to persuade Unifi to donate the 44 acre site to Preservation North Carolina. Revitalization of the mill village began in 1996, and to date more than 50 houses have been restored.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p100-102, 104-107, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7322
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Becky Phillips, executive director of the Fort Defiance Museum, the home of General William Lenoir in Caldwell County, and Teresa Teague, conservator at Two Turtles Textiles, a company specializing in the preservation of textiles, seek to preserve clothing and quilts from the past as a way of learning about and guarding the history of North Carolina. The two discuss what clothing from the past centuries can reveal, how to store and display quilts, and ways to preserve centuries-old clothing.
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Record #:
7323
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The Single Sisters House at Salem College in Winston-Salem is the oldest building on a North Carolina college campus. The year on the date stone of the original house is 1786. A 19th-century addition enclosed it, although it is still visible in the attic of the addition. In the early days, the house served as quarters for students and teachers, who lived, studied, worshipped, and worked together. The house is being reclaimed and rededicated by Salem Academy and College as a national landmark of women's education.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p94-96, 98, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7324
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The Fort Bragg Cultural Resources Program unearths, catalogs, and preserves the rich historical resources that are located on the fort's 160,000 acres. The program manages prehistoric archaeological sites, historic landscapes, artifacts, and documents. The National Historic Preservation Act of 1966 requires all federal installations to make this preservation effort. The program has identified over 3,900 archaeological sites, 374 historic buildings, 27 historic cemeteries, and a Civil War battlefield.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p108-110, 112, 114-115, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
7332
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Bob Jenkins, a native of Sneads Ferry, spent much of his early life in Wilmington, before going off to study interior design. When he returned to Wilmington in the late 1960s, he found the downtown area had become seedy and catered to a coarse trade. Families had moved out, and many of the old historic homes were decaying or being torn down. Jenkins became a pioneer when he opened a design shop near the riverfront and purchased one of the historic homes nearby. Fortunately, he found other like-minded individuals who cared about revitalizing downtown and preserving historic buildings. Today more than three hundred blocks of downtown Wilmington are on the National Register of Historic Places, and the town is mentioned in the same breath as Savannah and Charleston. Jenkins retired in 1989, and is the owner and sole employee of Wilmington's Adventure and Walking Tours.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Aug 2005, p134-138, il Periodical Website
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