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8 results for Our State Vol. 67 Issue 1, June 1999
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Record #:
4191
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Gold mining and textile mills were standards in Albemarle's economy from the 1820s into the 20th-century. Gold played out in the mid-1900s, and textiles declined in the 1990s. Albemarle has since diversified its economic base through new businesses, like Collins and Aikman, and preservation of the city's history, making it attractive to tourists. Passage of a 1998 ABC referendum also made Albemarle, once the state's second largest dry city, attractive to chain restaurants, full-service hotels, and local entrepreneurs.
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4214
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Pinehurst has an equine tradition as well as a golfing one. Northerners who started visiting the village in 1910 also brought their horses. From that practice developed a race rack, stables, grandstand, and in 1917, a county fair. The Amphidrone, an 8,400-square-foot structure, was built for exhibitions. A tornado damaged it in 1932, and the building was later converted into a stable. In 1995, restoration began on the building, which is the state's oldest fair exhibition hall.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 1, June 1999, p39, 41-42, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4217
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While many people think of golf when they hear the word Pinehurst, there are other recreational pursuits for visitors to enjoy in and around the village and in Moore County. History buffs can visit sites including the Malcolm Blue Farm and Museum and Weymouth Center, former home of novelist James Boyd. Pinehurst Village has a variety of shops. The PGA World Golf Hall of Fame and Sandhills Horticultural Gardens are also nearby.
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4219
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In 1920, Lillian Exum Clement of Buncombe County was elected to the North Carolina General Assembly, becoming the South's first woman legislator. What was even more remarkable was that she was elected by men, who were the only legal voters in 1920. Sixteen of the seventeen bills she introduced became law. She was also Buncombe County's first female lawyer and the first to have a practice without male partners.
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4218
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Steve and Sandy Forest started Brushy Mountain Bee Farm in their kitchen over twenty years ago. The farm, located near Wadesboro, had revenues of over $2 million in 1998. The Forests not only raise bees and sell honey, but they also have a web site, publish a catalog, and supply beekeepers worldwide with supplies through a mail-order service.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 1, June 1999, p18, 20-22, 24, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4215
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When the state's barrier islands are mentioned, many people think of the Outer Banks. However, off the coast of Brunswick County lies another chain of islands - Oak Island, Holden Beach, Ocean Isle Beach, and Sunset Beach - that are similar in climate, flora, and fauna, but different in character, history, and appearance.
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4216
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The town of Pinehurst is one of the world's best-known golfing communities. From June 14 through 20, Pinehurst No. 2 golf course will host the 1999 U.S. Open, the national championship of golf. The course, designed by Donald Ross, is one of the most beautiful, and also one of the most challenging, golf courses in the world.
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Record #:
4223
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Established in November, 1861, the Confederate Salisbury Prison held as many as 10,000 captured Union troops in an area designed for 2,500. Food, clothing, and sanitary conditions were miserable and got worse as the war continued. Salisbury Prison was destroyed in April, 1865, by Union troops who liberated it. A recent symposium, held in Salisbury in July, 1988, brought together scholars, scientists, and descendants of prison guards and POWs.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 67 Issue 1, June 1999, p69-71, 73-74, il Periodical Website
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