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11 results for North Carolina Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991
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Record #:
568
Author(s):
Abstract:
C. D. Spangler, Jr. is President of the University of North Carolina system.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p12-16, por
Record #:
569
Author(s):
Abstract:
Rising tuition at North Carolina's community colleges may be closing doors to an increasing population of students who are trying to increase their marketable skills.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p28-30, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
577
Author(s):
Abstract:
Many Charlotte executives are hoping that NCNB's merger with C&S/Sovran will boost the local economy and send some business their way.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p8-9, il
Record #:
29258
Author(s):
Abstract:
Despite the Soviet Union's political and economic turmoil, there is opportunity for international trade with the North Carolina-USSR Trade Association. The Association hopes to facilitate business contacts, market orientation, and training.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p10, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
29302
Author(s):
Abstract:
Educational reform in North Carolina has become a concern for corporations. Supplying schools with funds for cut budgets, serving on school committees, school boards, and foundations, running for office on a school reform platform, and participating in groups such as the Business Committee for Education are some of the ways North Carolina businesses are attempting to take action against low test scores, dropout rates, and a shortage of qualified applicants.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p24, 39, 42-43, por
Record #:
29300
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the face of national recession and skyrocketing unemployment rates, North Carolina has been able to withstand the downturns thanks to the state's diversified economic profile. Large private sector employers, research universities, grocery store chains, textile industries, large computer markets, and multi-store retailers have aided in making North Carolina's economy more sound.
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Record #:
29301
Author(s):
Abstract:
The 1991 North Carolina General Assembly met with great controversy after convening. This year marked the largest cuts in state spending along side the largest tax increase in state history. Spending cuts were delivered mainly to education budgets, while tax increases were made to the state sales tax and corporate income taxes.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p21-23, il
Record #:
29325
Author(s):
Abstract:
With nearly 124,500 full time employees, public schools are North Carolina's largest employer. Although public schools typically get the largest part of the state budget each year, the General Assembly cut the Department of Public Education's budget, eliminating new school bus funds and allotments for textbooks, supplies, and instructional materials.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p26, por
Record #:
29330
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina's proposed new drinking water, watershed protection rules are being reviewed by the North Carolina Citizens for Business and Industry. The rules would focus on non-point source pollution and restrict commercial and industrial development in more than one-quarter of the state's lands.
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Record #:
29329
Author(s):
Abstract:
Julianne still Thrift has been named president of Salem Academy and College, the 18th president and first female to hold the administrative office since the school was founded in 1772 by early Moravian settlers.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 9, Sept 1991, p44, por
Record #:
29331
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Economic and Community Development--including the Office of Minority Development and Small Business Division--, the Business and Industry Development Division, and the NC Film Office all took large budget cuts this fiscal year. These cuts have curtailed some development across the state and pushed North Carolina down the list of top film-making states.
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