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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 72 Issue 1, Jan 1995
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Record #:
21473
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Abstract:
An examination of the practice of looting and plundering stranded vessels, called \"wrecking,\" via the investigation of three incents between 1698 and 1750 on the Outer Banks, to provide insight into the behavior of the colonists who exploited the accidents as well as the attitudes and capacities of the governing authorities charged with upholding royal laws, maintaining order, and punishing lawbreakers.
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Record #:
21484
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Abstract:
A look at the unique circumstances surrounding Confederate conscription in North Carolina during the Civil War. Because North Carolina provided over one-fourth of all conscripts in the Confederate Army and had so many Union sympathizers and a strong peace movement, serious conflict occurred. The most common action in response to conscription was to fight it in court. Because there was no Confederate Supreme Court, cases were sent to North Carolina's judiciary, which was intent on preserving the state's sovereignty, and where the chief justice was sympathetic toward conscripts.
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Record #:
21483
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Abstract:
This article looks at religious life in the North Carolina interior and suggests how religion influenced the North Carolina Regulator Movement, a loosely organized protest movement of settlers in the North Carolina backcountry during the 1760s and early 1770s that began as a peaceful expression of the settlers' discontent over political and economic conditions and developed into a series of increasingly violent mob actions that ended with a pitched battle between the Regulators and militia led by the colonial governor.
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