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7 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 53 Issue 4, Oct 1976
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Record #:
21309
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Abstract:
It is a common thought that after the Civil War, Southern railroads could not have been repaired to working condition without the help of the Union Army. The railroads of North Carolina needed only minor repairs to assist in a temporary military occupation. Within six months after the conflict, the Army conducted no maintenance work at all and left the rails in worse condition that when they found them.
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Record #:
21311
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In his 1873 novel 'Sea Gift', author Edwin Wiley Fuller depicted student and city life in Chapel Hill, North Carolina between 1843 and 1868. In 'Sea Gift', Fuller examines love, dueling, pride, freshman hazing and the distinction between social classes in the book. Though viewed favorably by most reviewers, the book never received widespread accolade.
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Record #:
21310
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Abstract:
If a deceased North Carolina slaveholder wanted to free their slaves in their will and send them to Liberia, there was often little resistance in having these wishes carried out. In the event of legal heirs contesting the wills and requests for freedom, it was often taken to the North Carolina Supreme Court for judgment. The American Colonization Society was often legally involved on the behalf of the slaves to be freed.
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Record #:
21312
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The New Deal of the 1930s that impacted Indian society was designed to correct the erroneous policies of the previous 50 years. Despite its best attempts, it failed to have a significant impact on the Cherokee of western North Carolina. The infusion of public money weakened the tribe's economic foothold as members were discouraged from farming and cultural handicraft.
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Record #:
21319
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In the 1896 gubernatorial race, black Republican voters were divided over the candidacy of Daniel L. Russell. Conservative black Republicans opposed Russell because of his wish of fusion with the Populist Party and detesting his public racial insults. Others favored fusion with the Populists as a means of avoiding Democratic dominance and the expected racial prejudice. A victorious Russell was brought about by good organizational tactics and a bulk of black voters brought over by Democratic anti-black campaign rhetoric.
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Record #:
21320
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This article challenges and reevaluates several of historian Julian Boyd's interpretations regarding the appointments of sheriffs in colonial North Carolina. The author uses quantitative evidence from 14 counties, the number of sheriffs who were justices of the peace, the frequency of self-recommendation, the frequency of county court recommendations and the governor's use of independent judgment in the appointment of sheriffs.
Record #:
21318
Author(s):
Abstract:
Between 1899 and 1904, Durham native Edward James Parrish lived in Japan as a representative for James B. Duke's American Tobacco Company. Parrish worked closely with the Murai Brothers Company Ltd., to improve production, financing, and marketing techniques for the tobacco company. In 1904, the Japanese Diet introduced and passed legislation that began government ownership of all tobacco manufacturing, Parrish was influential in the company receiving a good settlement with the government.
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