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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 41 Issue 1, Jan 1964
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Record #:
20574
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Abstract:
Calvin H. Wiley was the Superintendent of Common Schools from 1852 to 1865 in North Carolina. Though a slave owner, Wiley held more sympathetic views towards African Americans. By analyzing Wiley's portrayal of African Americans in two of his novels, \"Alamance\" and \"Roanoke,\" the author evaluates Wiley's perspective on slavery and how this differed from his peers.
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Record #:
20614
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North Carolina's textile industry not only survived the Civil War, it thrived in the chaotic post-war years. Using newspaper accounts from across the state, the author describes the social and economic conditions that allowed textiles to flourish after the war and the major historical figures involved in running existing mills and opening new ones throughout the state. The article also includes a comprehensive list of operational cotton mills in the state between 1865 and 1884.
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Record #:
20613
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The article reviews the role of Committee of Public Safety in the Wilmington-New Hanover area during the Revolutionary War. Committee members were entrusted to contain British Governor Martin and squelch Highlander loyalties to the British Crown. The author documents the connection between the Committee's decisions and outcomes of two important events: The Battle of Moore's Creek (1776) and the Highland rising at Cross Creek (1776).
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Record #:
20615
Abstract:
Richard Jordan Gatling invented the Gatling gun, a revolutionary weapon first used during the Civil War. The author discusses Gatling's family history, his early life in Hertford County, and his other entrepreneurial endeavors before he created the Gatling gun. The original patent and schematics of the Gatling gun are included in the article.
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Record #:
20616
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Abstract:
After the election of 1896 Republican candidates failed to win a gubernatorial election for fifty years. Despite repeated failure, Republicans did gain support in the early 20th century. The author examines both state and national politics to better understand the era's Republican party and its relationship with North Carolinians.
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