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5 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 30 Issue 3, July 1953
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Record #:
20546
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This is the first in a series of articles looking at the development and use of fertilizers in the southeast from 1840-1950. This installment looks at the introduction of gull manure, called guano, during the period of 1840-1890, when the use of manures was becoming very popular for use in the resuscitation of old fields and the prevention of land exhaustion.
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Record #:
20547
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This article describes the practices and ethical standards of the legal professions in the period between 1820-1860. Elements such as advertising for services, practicing in and traveling to different courts within the circuit, courtroom practices, the administration of justice, trial procedure, membership in the bar, and ethical standards are explored.
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Record #:
20548
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This article examines several potential causes for the slow development of the labor movement in the State, including the impact of slavery, southern Calvinistic views on the immorality of striking, a fear of Catholicism and Northern labor organizers, sectionalism, and slow industrialization, among others.
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Record #:
20597
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This article looks at the impact of a temporary department of North Carolina, enacted by Union Secretary of War Stanton, which was created to facilitate federal operations in the Carolinas and was run by Maj. Gen. John M. Schofield and subject to General William T. Sherman's orders. This department continued beyond the short period for which it was designed and left Schofield in charge of troops in North Carolina and then in charge of the transition to reconstruction, thus affecting how the machinery for reconstruction-era judiciary was to be established.
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Record #:
20596
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This article examines the journalism profession, newspaper production, and editors' writings and ethics between 1815 and 1835.
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