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3 results for North Carolina Historical Review Vol. 2 Issue 4, Oct 1925
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Record #:
19620
Abstract:
Continued from July 1925, Vol. 2(3), pp. 332-350. Randolph Shotwell served time at three different Federal prisons during his lifetime and recorded his experiences at each. Captured during the Civil War in 1864 he was first confined at Point Lookout, Maryland, then was moved to Fort Delaware where he remained until the end of the war. In 1871 he was convicted on false evidence in the Ku Klux Conspiracy and sentenced to six years at the Federal Penitentiary in Albany, NY before being pardoned by President Grant after serving two years. An examination of his time at Albany is presented in this third and final installment.
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Record #:
19618
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Abstract:
Westward transportation became a priority in North Carolina as early as 1762, but roads and canal projects were insufficient in expanding commerce within the states. Early North Carolina Railroads roads were formed into trunk line systems to link new roads with established North-South carriers. The Cape Fear and Yadkin Valley Railway was a distinct effort to establish an east-west connection across North Carolina extending from the mountains to the State's largest port at the coast. The project was begun in 1879 and was dissolved by the General Assembly during the 1922-23 session.
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Record #:
19619
Author(s):
Abstract:
At the outbreak of the French and Indian War in 1754, both the English and French sought the friendship and aid of the Cherokee Indians. To prevent the Cherokee from aiding the French and in response to the Indians' request that a fort be built for protection, the South Carolinians began construction of Fort Loudoun on the Little Tennessee River in 1756 and completed the project in 1757. While the fort was an initial success at peacekeeping, by 1758 conflict sprung up between the Cherokee and the English that would continue until 1761 when the fort fell and the Cherokee were defeated.
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