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10 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 55 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 2008
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16231
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Located in the Sandhills region of North Carolina, the Sandhills Family Heritage Association (SFHA) works to preserve the unique natural and cultural heritage of African-American families in the Sandhills region, while also carrying on those traditions that have helped sustain the community and culture for hundreds of years.\r\nEnvironmental conservationists have long recognized the Sandhills region as one of the most distinctive and endangered ecosystems in North Carolina and the country. The unique African-American culture that flourishes here is, likewise, nationally significant. The Sandhills Family Heritage Association recognizes that the preservation of its culture is inextricably linked to the land and its residents'ability to live self-sufficiently from that land. As a result, this grassroots organization's work focuses on building what are called \"Communities of HOPE\" through heritage preservation, ownership of land, public education, and economic development, all of which are inter-connected goals given the nature of African-American culture in the Sandhills region.
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Record #:
16230
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Baldwin explores ways to collect family traditions before they are lost for future generations. She highlights specific points that ensure stories will be collected and respect will be maintained.
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Record #:
16234
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In March 2006, the W. L. Eury Appalachian Collection at Appalachian State University's Carol Grotnes Belk Library and Information Commons began a project for the purpose of\r\ndigitizing the folksong collections of two former university icons, Dr. Isaac Garfield (I. G. or \"Ike\") Greer (1881-1967) and Dr. William Amos (\"Doc\") Abrams (1905-1991). The project was entitled \"So Mote It Ever Be: The Folksong Heritage of North Carolina's Northern Blue\r\nRidge Mountains.\" The process would entail scanning each unique textual document in these collections (using North Carolina Exploring Cultural Heritage Online [NC-ECHO] guidelines), transcribing the texts in plain text word processing format, digitally recording the analog field recordings, and compiling metadata for these items\r\n(such as informants, geographic associations, and scholarly classification schemes).
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Record #:
16233
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Cecelski discusses a series of interviews done with former residents of Portsmouth Island, founded in 1754 and abandoned in 1971. Stories shed light on Outer Banks history and culture.
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Record #:
36536
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Duncan is the recipient of the Brown-Hudson Folklore Award for her work in giving Cherokee people a voice in folklore and ongoing research. She developed folklore and folklife curriculums for teachers in Macon County and created an archive for research.
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36537
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W. Amos Abrams, folklorist and noted contributor to the NCFJ, became interested in folk ballads when he studied under Frank C. Brown at Duke University. He continued his study and collection of ballads throughout his long career as a folklorist.
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Record #:
36535
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Karen Baldwin was the editor of NCFJ for six years, maintaining its publication over a difficult transitional period.
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36532
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Karen Baldwin, a folklorist and English professor at ECU, passed away from cancer in November 14, 2007. Her published works are cited and a scholarship was established in her name at Guilford College, where she completed her undergraduate degree.
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Record #:
36534
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A transcribed interview between the authors talking about the life of Karen Baldwin. A song sung in her honor is also transcribed.
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