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5 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 38 Issue 1, Wntr/Spr 1991
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Record #:
16250
Abstract:
Shortly after World War I, the pottery industry in North Carolina underwent some major transformations. The wares changed from the old utilitarian jars and jugs to smaller, more brightly colored forms. The potters also adopted new technologies and marketing strategies to reach a new clientele. But perhaps the greatest innovation was that women began turning wares and taking a major role in the business. And the very first women of all was Nell Cole Graves.
Record #:
16251
Author(s):
Abstract:
In quality and strength of its musical traditions, few areas of the United States compare with the region of the Blue Ridge Mountains. The region's old-time, bluegrass, and gospel music finds expression in the extraordinary talents of individual musicians and supports from a systems of institutions that include families, schools, churches, conventions, festivals, record companies and radio stations. Since it began broadcasting in 1948, Mount Airy radio stations WPAQ-AM has remained a powerful force in promoting its region's traditions. WPAQ owes its importance to the vision and commitment of station owner Ralph Epperson, who has made the radio a family and personal enterprise and support of traditional music a vocation.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35922
Author(s):
Abstract:
Amateur, or ham, radio is a method of distance communication enjoyed by people of all ages and social backgrounds. To keep track of their different radio contacts, they used QSL cards, which were kept and displayed in many ways such as photo albums, picture frames, file boxes, and plastic folders.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35921
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mollie Blankenship serves on the board of the Cherokee Historical Association and works on behalf of the Oconaluftee Indian Village, along with serving on the advisory council to the state agricultural extension service and has helped develop programs for senior citizens.
Record #:
35923
Author(s):
Abstract:
A pediatric doctor by trade, Dr. Hughes uses his facility for language and propensity for humor and rhyming expressiveness in virtually every arena of his life, including in his occupation and family folklore.