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6 results for North Carolina Folklore Journal Vol. 32 Issue 2, Fall-Winter 1984
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Record #:
16309
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Abstract:
Mrs. Emma Dupree was born to a tradition of knowing about the curative and preventative uses of the natural pharmacopeia which grew wild along the banks of the creeks and branches and the Tar River in her home area of Falkland in Pitt County. Her interest in the healing, helping effects of the plants was established early as well as her sense of place and community. In Fountain where she lives, Mrs. Dupree serves her community of neighbors primarily with the plants she keeps in the small gardens surrounding her house. She grows a variety of sage, mint, tansy, and rabbit tobacco along with her flowers and the healing berry tree.
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Record #:
16310
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Abstract:
While growing up by the sea at Beaufort, Borden Mace spoke the English for which the area is noted. After a distinguished career in educational film production, Mace was lured to the helm of the Appalachian Consortium with headquarters on the campus of Appalachian State University at Boone. In his travels in Appalachia he became acquainted with the folk speech of the region, nothing that, like the speech of coastal Carolina, it possessed a Middle English flavor. Fascinated by the lore and speech ways of the Appalachia, Mace published the first recent history of Western North Carolina and a collection of mountain speech and idiom in BITS OF MOUNTAIN SPEECH.
Record #:
16311
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Abstract:
In the Work of William E. Young of Pantego, Afro-American art has come full circle. Having steeped himself in the black cultures of the Caribbean and the eastern seaboard states, Young has turned directly to the source--Africa--for the inspiration of much of his work. Today he works in a variety of media, including cement, watercolors and oil paints. But most of his energy is devoted to wood sculpture, and it is here that Africa is most clearly visible in Young's work.
Record #:
16312
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Abstract:
Arthur Palmer Hudson, eminent folklorist, describes \"Poor Naomi\" as North Carolina's \"principal contribution to American folksong.\" A part of the Murdered Girl tradition, the ballad has well-known counterparts in other countries and cultures. But \"Naomi Wise\" has evolved from an earlier date and is now widely diffused in North Carolina and beyond, The historical facts behind the ballad, however, have not been adequately explored.
Record #:
35842
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Abstract:
When North Carolina was still being settled by colonists, settlers in the mountain region used odd character notation for sight reading of music in Appalachia. These ‘shaped notes’ indicated the tone by their unique shape, whether written alone or placed on the lines and spaces of a musical staff.
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Record #:
35841
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Abstract:
Born and raised in Chatham County, Lillie Lee and Jennie Burnett both started making quilts when they were children.
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