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5 results for North Carolina Archaeology Vol. 52 Issue , Oct 2003
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Record #:
18608
Abstract:
Archaeology and geography staff and students from the University of North Carolina at Greensboro used multidisciplinary research to explore the occupation of Tannenbaum Historic Park in Greensboro from the American Revolution to the present. The Park is part of the Guilford Courthouse Battlefield National Historic Landmark and is believed to be the location where General Cornwallis formed the first British line of attack which proceeded into the current Guilford Courthouse National Military Park.
Source:
North Carolina Archaeology (NoCar E 78 S55 S6), Vol. 52 Issue , Oct 2003, p20-52, map, bibl, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18607
Author(s):
Abstract:
Native American archaeological sites post-dating A.D. 1450 are rare in the Appalachian Summit of northwestern North Carolina, which includes Allegheny, Ashe, Avery, and Watauga counties. The only confirmed sites at high elevations provide evidence that climate change allowed agriculture above 2,500ft after A.D. 900, human settlement was restricted to individual households, and permanent settlement was restricted after 1450.
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Record #:
35204
Abstract:
This site in Moore County, sponsored by the Department of Transportation and taking place in 2002-2003, intended to determine reasons for the variation of projectile points. Discussed were the excavation and stratigraphy of the Horses Grazing Site. Factors noted by Joel Gunn and Irwin Royner of the hunters were reasons for choosing this area, the time periods in which horse grazing was at its height, the types of arrowheads manufactured, and Horse Grazing point morphology. The conclusion derived was that game hunters migrated in response to a decrease of megafauna in the area. Data illustrating point measurements is contained in Appendix A.
Record #:
35205
Abstract:
An examination of the region’s geographical aspects that encouraged the archaeological developments of residing Native Americans intended to interpret the sedimentary processes of the Holocene and Pleistocene periods. Methods utilized included aerial photographs, soil profiles, and sediment sampling. Conclusions derived: a cultural horizon buried in an Aeolian deposit; shallow and deeper deposits in the excavation sites; sediment erosion on the southwest slope and buildup on the northeastern slope; thicker post-aeolian deposits on the northeastern slope; porous sand and gravel suggesting Native American occupancy. From these conclusions, the author suggested that this model can be used for future Coastal Plain soil studies.
Subject(s):
Record #:
35207
Abstract:
Keith Seramur and Ellen Cowan examined the region’s geographical aspects that encouraged the archaeological developments of residing Native Americans intended to interpret the sedimentary processes of the Holocene and Pleistocene periods. Methods utilized included aerial photographs, soil profiles, and sediment sampling. Conclusions derived: a cultural horizon buried in an Aeolian deposit; shallow and deeper deposits in the excavation sites; sediment erosion on the southwest slope and buildup on the northeastern slope; thicker post-aeolian deposits on the northeastern slope; porous sand and gravel suggesting Native American occupancy. From these conclusions, the author suggested that this model can be used for future Coastal Plain soil studies.