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7 results for Metro Magazine Vol. 6 Issue 10, Oct 2005
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7420
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On the advice of Native Americans, early North Carolina settlers planted muscadine grapes. People eat the meat of the grape but not the seeds and thick skin. Jerry Smith, CEO and owner of bottled-water LeBleu Corporation in Advance, North Carolina, felt the seeds contained medicinal properties. Smith hired a scientist at the University of Georgia to study the muscadine seeds. The scientist discovered that the seeds contain an inordinate amount of antioxidants, the compounds that protect the body from free radicals that are blamed for all sorts of health problems. Smith processes the seeds into capsules that his company sells.
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7417
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Since Reconstruction days, no Republican presidential candidate had carried a Southern state. President Theodore Roosevelt, one of the nation's most popular presidents, was invited to make an address in Raleigh on October 19, 1905. Roosevelt thought his personal popularity and the fact that his mother was from Georgia might help in future elections. Lawing recounts the events of Roosevelt's visit to Raleigh and Durham.
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7419
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Neurology is a broad field that covers a variety of diseases, from Parkinson's to stroke and Alzheimer's. Annual costs for treatments run into billions of dollars nationwide. At the medical centers at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and Duke University, cutting-edge clinical research studies are being conducted. Vecchione discusses what the researchers are studying.
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7418
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Jannette Fishell is professor of organ and sacred music at East Carolina University. She was also instrumental in obtaining the Perkins and Wells Memorial Organ for St. Paul's Episcopal Church in Greenville. Built by Fisk, the organ, with 3,000 pipes, is one of the largest instruments of its kind on the East Coast.
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7421
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The golf course at the Raleigh Country Club was the last course designed by the legendary Donald Ross and was the one he was working on at the time of his death in 1948. In August 2003, John McConnell, a local entrepreneur, rescued the bankrupt club from a local group of developers who had begun planning development other than golf. He bought out the developers and brought in architect Richard Mandel who specializes in Ross restorations. McConnell says the course will be one that tests golfers every day, and not one that offers cooking classes, wine tastings, and dinner dances.
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7422
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Incorporated in 1873, Apex was one of the first towns to develop around Raleigh. Because it was the highest point on the Chatham Railroad between Richmond, Virginia, and Jacksonville, Florida, it took the name of Apex. The town has grown from 5,000 residents in 1990 to 30,000 today, with the numbers expected to double in the next decade. Lea discusses the progress of Apex as it changes from a sleepy stop into one of the dynamic centers in the Research Triangle Metropolitan Region.
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7423
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Leutze reports on the inaugural East Coast Waterways and Beach Symposium held at Emerald Isle in July 2005. Discussions were held on the most important developments along the coast and included dredging, beach nourishment, infrastructure needs, and the federal government's attitude toward coastal services.
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