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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Friend of Wildlife Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990
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Record #:
26506
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s greatest environmental problems are related to sediment, nutrients, and eutrophication issues implicating public health and activity. Hydrilla, an invasive weed, is threatening freshwater lakes and impeding boating activities. Industrial pollution and toxic metals are contaminating fish and limiting fish consumption.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p6-8, il
Record #:
26508
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina legislature set a goal to recycle 25 percent of the total waste stream. New technologies are helping to make recycling a more viable alternative to waste disposal, but there is still debate over costs. Industries see recycling as a potential for profit, but local municipalities see it as an expense.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p14-15, il, por
Subject(s):
Record #:
26505
Author(s):
Abstract:
Scientists from the U.S. Forest Service have found a strong correlation between acid rain and a disease which has killed thousands of dogwood trees across the United States. Indications are that it will spread considerably throughout North Carolina and the South in the near future.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p5, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
26507
Abstract:
For this year’s Earth Day, the North Carolina Wildlife Federation is joining other environmental groups to plan a number of citizen outreach programs. They are promoting daily activities that can lessen human impact on the environment.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p9, il
Record #:
26509
Author(s):
Abstract:
Regulations often frustrate hunters and fishermen, but are imposed to meet the public’s needs and desires now and in the future. Managers are asking sportsmen to have an open mind and to consider regulations in the context of the biological limitations and social constraints.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1990, p14-15, il
Subject(s):