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101 results for "Washington the Magazine"
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Record #:
19584
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Water aerobics is one of the most popular classes offered at the Vidant Wellness Center. During one of the four hour-long classes offered per day, students participate in cardio and resistance activities that does not put strain on their joints. Bolstered by referrals from local health care professionals, water aerobics has bettered the physical and mental health of its students and the community.
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Record #:
19583
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Washington artisan Chip Shackleford continues to practice the art of glassblowing, a time honored tradition that is over two thousand years old. Shackleford considers conservation a key aspect of his art as over 90 percent of the materials he uses are recycled. Now he is attempting to get involved in the production of restoration glass for use in historic homes.
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Record #:
19580
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This past March, the first Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition was held at the Washington Civic Center. Created as a collaboration between the Pamlico Writers Group and the Beaufort County Arts Council, the conference and competition received entries from local North Carolina writers and entrants from as far away as France.
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Record #:
19582
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Wine has long been lauded for its medicinal used throughout recorded history. In 1991, 60 minutes aired a broadcast in which it discussed the dietary and health benefits of wine. Health care professionals agree that moderation is the key to benefiting from the consumption of wine.
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Record #:
19581
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With the warming spring temperatures, fishing on the Pamlico River will similarily warm up as well. Spring anglers should expect excellent speckled trout fishing with many keepers in the 15-20 inch range. In addition to speckled trout, anglers should expect redfish and striped-bass in abundance.
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Record #:
21942
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The James Adams Floating Theatre was an attraction which cruised the coastal waters of the state and as far north as Virginia and as far south as Georgia. The boat, built in 1913 in Washington at a cost of $25,000, was owned and operated by James Adams a performer from Saginaw, Michigan. It could hold 850 people there were performances aboard every day. Novelist and playwright Edna Ferber used her 4-day experience on the James Adams to compose her novel, Show Boat, which was later turned in a Broadway musical.
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Record #:
21941
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For sixteen years the Washington Area Historic Foundation has produced and offered for sale a Christmas tree ornament depicting a structure of interest in the city. Past ornaments have shown the Singleton Primitive Baptist, the old courthouse, and the old City Hall. Historic St. Peter's Episcopal Church is featured on the current one. The item sells for $25, and the money raised supports community projects like the Water Street Park and the Harding Square landscaping.
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Record #:
21944
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Clayborne recounts the history of Washington's Turnage Theatre. It was in danger of demolition in the 1990s, but through the efforts of a nonprofit, the theatre was restored and reopened in 2007. Clayborne's article describes the vaudeville section of the theatre on the uppermost floor. It could seat 900 and the leading vaudeville stars performed there. That section of the Turnage is still awaiting restoration.
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Record #:
21947
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Steve Ainsworth is a retired orthopedic surgeon. In 2002, he was able pick up an activity that had interested him when he was a kid--woodworking. He has a workshop near his Washington home where he fashions works of art. He rarely buys a piece of wood because so much is available. His preferred wood is cherry, though he uses oak for furniture, and sometimes pecan branches for a particular project.
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Record #:
21948
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Colonel Joshua T. Tayloe built his home, Elmwood, in Washington in 1820. It is located at 721 W. Main Street. Frannye Fowle purchased the home in 2007; she discusses with Rumley how she has furnished the home.
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Record #:
21940
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Artist Jayne Wall talks about her lifetime experiences and her artistic creations.
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Record #:
21951
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Oesterreich describes the ECU Storybook Theatre, a program created seventeen years ago by Patricia \"Patch\" Clark, an associate professor in the ECU School of Theatre and Dance. Basically a storybook is chosen and professor and students turn it into a play. The group began performing at Barnes & Noble and later expanded to other venues like Washington's Turnage Theatre and public schools in the surrounding area. In summer of 2012, Clark and some of her students will travel to Iraq to perform.
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Record #:
21950
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Washington and Beaufort County provided eleven companies--five artillery, five infantry, and one cavalry--to the Civil War, as well as a state militia. Union forces captured the city in 1862 and held it until 1864 when they withdrew, burning most of the town behind them.
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Record #:
21957
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\"They've been called blue grass and newgrass. Some have tried to pigeonhole its sound as country, Americana, indie roots rock.\" However, the music Carolina Still plays defies genre, and the best anyone can come up with is \"old-time moonshiner stomp.\" The band performs about 200 shows a year from Eastern Carolina (their home base) to Memphis and New York. Rumley talks with band members about their style and music over the past eight years.
Source:
Washington the Magazine (NoCar F264.W3 W37), Vol. 1 Issue 4, May/June 2012, p27-29,31, 33, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
21952
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Rumley describes Idylwild, a 1907 house built in Washington on Market Street. In 1901, Washingtonian Blake Baker Nicholson married Sally Davis Owens, a widow from Oxford, Mississippi, and built their home six years later. The house is a mixture of styles--Green revival, plantation, and Tudor.
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