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20 results for Literature--North Carolina
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Record #:
14273
Author(s):
Abstract:
Walser presents Dr. Thomas H. English's list of \"Famous Southern Books\" for North Carolina; books that have had a wide influence in transmitting the history, traditions, ideals, and character of North Carolina.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 6, July 1947, p9, 20
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Record #:
15022
Author(s):
Abstract:
A century of literary development at the University of North Carolina is reviewed in the 100th anniversary issue of The Carolina Magazine, a monthly literary-humorous magazine published by and for students. The magazine is the oldest college publication in North Carolina and one of the six oldest such periodicals in the nation.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 10 Issue 48, May 1943, p8-9, 29, f
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Record #:
18609
Author(s):
Abstract:
Author Charles Frazier reflects on his experiences with the adaptation of his critically acclaimed novel Cold Mountain into a full length feature film. While doing so Frazier explores what the screenwriter owes the novelist and the fundamental differences between the novel and film.
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Record #:
19073
Abstract:
The production of rich, vivid, and creative literature out of North Carolina flows from the many sections of the state and the diverse cultural groups that make up the population. The German heritage of North Carolina is a treasure trove of culture and history that has been underutilized to this point in literature.
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Record #:
19285
Author(s):
Abstract:
This examination of the novel Plays Well With Others written by North Carolina author Alan Gurganus, explores its use of humor to contrast the somber topic of AIDS in 1980s New York and strife in small town North Carolina.
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Record #:
19494
Author(s):
Abstract:
A Wreath from the Woods of Carolina, written by Mary Ann Bryan Mason in 1859, was the first children's book written by a North Carolina. The book exemplifies the American juvenile literature of the antebellum period and utilized beautiful chromolithographs of native wildflowers to amaze its readers.
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Record #:
19580
Abstract:
This past March, the first Pamlico Writers Conference and Competition was held at the Washington Civic Center. Created as a collaboration between the Pamlico Writers Group and the Beaufort County Arts Council, the conference and competition received entries from local North Carolina writers and entrants from as far away as France.
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Record #:
19995
Abstract:
The life of author John Foster West is as unique as the characters in his novels. Born in the Appalachia region of North Carolina, West grew up the son of a tenant farmer and spent the majority of his career promoting Appalachian studies through the novels he wrote, the journals he founded, the creative writing programs he created, and the thousands of students he taught.
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Record #:
20202
Abstract:
After the American Civil War there was a movement by Southern archivists and journalists to emphasize and praise the Southern side of the conflict. Two Southern publications, The Land We Love and Our Living and Our Dead, were the vanguard of the resistance towards post-war Reconstruction and continued the verbal war for many years following the Civil War.
Record #:
20913
Author(s):
Abstract:
This is a reprint of an address given to the North Carolina Literary and Historical Organization on December 4, 1964 the relation between history and literature.
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Record #:
27495
Author(s):
Abstract:
Shannon Ravenel, the editor of Algonquin Books in Chapel Hill, talks about the state of Southern literature. The Southern writer most frequently writes about nostalgia, the passage of time, guilt, and ordinary things. While Southern fiction is often criticized for not keeping up with the times, Algonquin Books has recently received national attention on behalf of some of its authors. The publishing house was started in attempt to give a voice to talented writers who were shut out by New York publishers.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 39, Sept. 26-Oct. 2 1990, p10-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
28018
Author(s):
Abstract:
Nicolas Sparks is North Carolina’s most successful author in terms of book sales. Sparks has published 16 novels and 7 of his novels have been made into films. Sparks discusses how his themes help him keep his novels and characters unique, why he chooses to often set his stories along the Carolina coast, what it is like to write a screenplay of a novel, and what makes for a good story.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 37, September 2010, p31 Periodical Website
Record #:
28404
Author(s):
Abstract:
Algonquin Books of Chapel Hill celebrates its tenth anniversary this fall and the publishing house’s history is detailed. Algonquin’s founding by Louis D. Rubin, Jr. and Shannon Ravenel are described. Also detailed is the national attention and success the publishing house has achieved through its publication of Southern authors, unknown authors, and literary fiction. Finally, the publishing house’s struggles are also detailed and why they have remained successful.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 11 Issue 34, July 1993, p9-11 Periodical Website
Record #:
34659
Abstract:
This article is a follow-up of Higgins-Harrel’s previous interviews with the five listed authors. All five writers live in North Carolina or write about North Carolina topics, and have different ways of telling their stories, whether it be story-telling under a spotlight, writing poetry or fiction novels, or theatre productions.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p42-70, il, por, f Periodical Website
Record #:
34661
Author(s):
Abstract:
Why do so many writers come out of North Carolina? Ed Southern, executive director of the North Carolina Writer’s Network, attempts to answer this question in this article. He attributes the success of North Carolina to the Network, the “niceness” of North Carolinians, and the struggle between poverty and potential. He also states that in order to keep the title of “Writingest State”, North Carolina writers must encourage others to write the stories that they would like to write about, while demanding quality and perfection.
Source:
North Carolina Literary Review (NoCar PS 266 N8 N66x), Vol. 25 Issue 1, 2016, p92-99, il, por, f Periodical Website