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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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1110 results for "Popular Government"
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Record #:
11426
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Five legislative acts of the North Carolina General Assembly affect the responsibilities and finances of counties and the state. These include capping the state tax on motor fuels at 29.9 cents per gallon through June 30, 2009 and giving counties the authority to participate in financing highway construction and maintenance. Walden examinees the ramifications for county budgets and transportation choices.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 74 Issue 2, Winter 2009, p4-15, il, map, f
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Record #:
11427
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Because the state was losing some big manufacturing plants to other states, the North Carolina General Assembly passed the William S. Lee Quality Jobs and Business Expansion (Lee Act) in 1996. This allowed the state to be more assertive in offering financial and tax incentives. Morgan assesses the pros and cons of incentives.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 74 Issue 2, Winter 2009, p16-29, il, f
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Record #:
11433
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Should election campaigns in North Carolina be publically financed? What are the pros and cons of this approach? What are some common perceptions of public financing? The authors examine these and other questions and summarize the history of public financing in the state.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 74 Issue 2, Winter 2009, p30-41, il, f
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Record #:
11428
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Szypszak discusses misconceptions about eminent domain, including \"compensation must be paid for any interference with private property\" and \"business owners must be paid for lost profits.\"
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 74 Issue 2, Winter 2009, p43-45, il, f
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Record #:
11847
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To provide opportunities for their citizens to exercise, communities set aside areas for walking or bicycling. Planning for bicycling dates back to the 1970s, while pedestrian planning did not begin until 2004. The authors provide an overview of the seventy-two plans currently in use in the state.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 75 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p14-21, il, map, f
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Record #:
11848
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Many of North Carolina's western counties contain large sections of undeveloped and underdeveloped land. The authors surveyed a number of residents there to determine their feelings about zoning and land use.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 75 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p24-28, il, f
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Record #:
11849
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In 2001, the North Carolina General Assembly passed a safe surrender law which provides desperate parents or a single parent with an alternative to abandonment of their infants. The law is an attempt to prevent death or injury that might occur when a parent physically abandons an infant. Mason discusses how the law functions and how often it has been used.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 75 Issue 1, Fall 2009, p29-36, il, f
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Record #:
10303
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The authors describe the Public Intersection Project, an ongoing effort by the School of Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill, to build local capacity to stop sexual assault and domestic violence in North Carolina communities.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 2, Winter 2008, p5, 7, 9-19, il, f
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Record #:
10310
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Crawford-Douglas poses questions to help communities in North Carolina sort through issues brought on by global warming. These include: Why should there be any action? Who should take action? How can policy makers allocate resources to adaptation or mitigation? How can North Carolinians set priorities?
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2008, p2-9, il, f
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Record #:
10307
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With the passing of Robert Stipe, North Carolina has lost one of its champions of historic preservation. He held positions at the Institute of Government at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and served as the director of the state Division of Archives and History before joining the School of Design at North Carolina State University in 1976. He was a prolific writer of articles and books and the recipient of numerous awards for his historic preservation work.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 2, Winter 2008, p46-47, por
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Record #:
10312
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North Carolina's population is growing rapidly. By 2030, it will reach twelve million, making the state the seventh largest in the nation. Demand for energy is also keeping pace with this growth. Hughes discusses what steps Progress Energy Carolinas (formerly Carolina Power & Light) is taking to meet this increasing need for electricity.
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Record #:
10311
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North Carolina has the capacity to develop renewable energy in the form of wind power, biomass fuel, and solar power. Currently, the state's traditional energy supplies--coal, oil, natural gas, and uranium--come from other states. The authors discuss state policies that encourage the development of these renewable energies and present some lessons learned from other states.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2008, p12-23, il, map, f
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Record #:
10313
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Tazewell discusses alternative fuels available in North Carolina, such as biodiesel, ethanol, natural gas, propane, and electricity. Guidelines for deciding which to use are presented as well as ways to reduce emissions, conservation measures, and innovations being developed in North Carolina.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 3, Spring/Summer 2008, p27-39, il, map, f
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Record #:
10306
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Scarborough discusses how Sampson County, a rural county faced with limited resources, addresses critical educational needs.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 73 Issue 2, Winter 2008, p36-40, il, f
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Record #:
9759
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With a large number of baby boomers hitting retirement age, the state and nation are poised for a workforce crisis. Jacobson makes the case for workforce planning, or the process through which organizations either governmental or private prepare for present and future worker needs; describes the steps in the process; and examines planning efforts in some of the state's municipalities.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 72 Issue 2, Winter 2007, p9-25, il, f
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