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213 results for "North Carolina Insight"
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Record #:
18836
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The state's financial aid largely focused on students entering traditional four-year programs with less emphasis on those individuals entering community colleges. The author offers a statistical breakdown for the number of community college students and aid received. Sources for this funding is also explored, showing that much of the community college students receive federal funding and less state funding. Six sources of state funding are highlighted and the author encourages development of such programs like the Need-Based Teaching and Nursing Grant Program and how to enhance these for community college students.
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9165
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The North Carolina Center for Public Policy Research first evaluated charter schools in 2002. The conclusion then was that the state should continue the experiment and wait for five more years of data before deciding whether or not to expand the program and remove the cap which limited the number of schools to one hundred. Manuel discusses what the new data tells about academic performance, racial balance, transfers of innovations in charter schools to public schools, and management and financial compliance.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 22 Issue 2-3, May 2007, p2-28, 32-37, 44-71, il, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
9164
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Legislation passed by the 1996 General Assembly provides for the establishment of charter schools, or schools run by private, non-profit organizations. It is an experiment to see if removing state regulations will improve student performance. Manuel profiles four of these schools: Gaston College Preparatory, Northampton County; Quest Academy, North Raleigh; Children's Community School, Davidson; and Carolina International School, Cabarrus County.
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Record #:
9166
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Duda examines charter school programs in other states, including Florida, California, Ohio, New York, South Carolina, and Washington.
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Record #:
9188
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Too many students in the state are dropping out of school, placing North Carolina among the lowest states in that category. Stallings' discussion of the dropout problem includes how North Carolina tracks and measures dropout rates; which students drop out and why; and what the state and local school districts are doing to reduce the dropout rate. The article concludes with six recommendations for improving the state's dropout problem.
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Record #:
18889
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The state authorized charter schools in 1996 and since then 138 schools have been, at one point, operational. In 2007, 100 of these charter schools were functioning throughout the state. An assessment of these schools based on student learning, facilities, management, and financing demonstrates that charter schools often have lower scores in these areas when compared with public schools. Using information from the N.C. Center for Public Policy Research, the author makes suggestions for improving charter school performance and how to create a better educational environment for charter school students.
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Record #:
7808
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The persistent image of eastern North Carolina is one of an agrarian section with high poverty, a less educated workforce, and a lagging infrastructure. Quinterno examines what is driving the economy of this area in the twenty-first century and where people are employed--agriculture, manufacturing, retail and service, private employers, small businesses, and the military. Charts provide information on demographic characteristics of the region, workforce, wages, and the three largest private employers in each county.
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North Carolina Insight (NoCar JK 4101 N3x), Vol. 22 Issue 1, Feb 2006, p2-32, 35-37, il, map, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
7809
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In 2004, the eastern region of the state contributed 25.8 percent of the state's total travel expenditures, and five of the forty-one counties contributed 13.5 percent of the statewide total of $12.6 billion. Tourism is the third highest private sector employer in North Carolina and benefits hotels, restaurants, travel agencies, and welcome centers.
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Record #:
7810
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In 1920, Lillian Exum Clement became the first woman to serve in the General Assembly. In 1968, Henry Frye became the first African American elected to the General Assembly since the 19th-century.
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Record #:
7835
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Over 116,000 soldiers, approximately one-eighth of the troops in the United States military, are stationed in eastern North Carolina, along with more than 21,000 civilian workers on the military posts. The military presence pumps billions of dollars each year into the state's poorest region. The military impacts a number of areas besides the economy. This article examines the military's impact on the region's economy; North Carolina's share of defense contracts; ports; sales and property taxes; taxpayer-financed services and growth and housing; public schools; military spouses and retirees on the local work force; rates of crime, domestic violence, and child abuse; race relations; environment; the presence of drinking establishments, pawn shops, and tattoo parlors; and air space restrictions.
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Record #:
7834
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Agriculture in eastern North Carolina is a major contributor to the state's economy. In 2003, farms generated over $7 billion in cash receipts. Of the ten counties that brought in the most cash receipts for crops and livestock, seven were from the east. Duplin, Sampson, and Bladen Counties rank one, two, and three in hog production in the state. However, this section of the state does face challenges. Tobacco is no longer the number one crop; the federal buyout of the tobacco support program changed the business arrangement for raising it. Livestock producers face environmental regulations. Many farms are consolidating into larger ones. Whether this is good or bad for the farmer is yet to be determined. Global competition will affect the east, as well as the whole state.
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Record #:
7252
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Domestic violence occurs across many levels of society. It has become a major area of concern, both with the public and the North Carolina General Assembly. NORTH CAROLINA INSIGHT devotes the March 2005 issue to a discussion of it. Topics covered by the authors include resources on domestic and family violence; funding for domestic violence services; county programs for victims of domestic violence; the family court as a vehicle to address domestic discord; and recommendations for fighting domestic violence. A table categorizing domestic violence-related deaths in North Carolina from 2002 to 2004 is included. The list includes over 200 names, with pertinent information on the deaths.
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Record #:
7253
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NORTH CAROLINA INSIGHT ranks the most influential lobbyists in the state \"to help citizens understand which key interests and organizations have clout with the state legislators and to let citizens know who is not represented in the legislature.\" At the close of the 2003 North Carolina General Assembly, 567 lobbyists were registered with the North Carolina Secretary of State. The lobbyists represented 621 different companies or organizations.
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Record #:
7438
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Recent rulings by the North Carolina Supreme Court has forced the state to surrender $1.5 billion in realized revenue. The fiscal impact of the rulings is large and comes at a time when the state government is experiencing revenue shortfalls. White examines the following three cases that have had, and will continue to have, a large fiscal impact on North Carolina government:\r\nBAILEY V. NORTH CAROLINA, which concerned taxing of state retirees' pensions; SMITH V. STATE, which canceled the state's intangibles tax and the return of $600 million to taxpayers; and LEANDRO V. STATE OF NORTH CAROLINA, which stated that every child in North Carolina is entitled to a sound basic education.
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Record #:
6763
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The cultural mix of North Carolina's population is changing, but white and blacks still remain the largest groups, with blacks being the largest minority at 21.6 percent. However, other population groups, including Asians and Hispanic/Latinos, are increasing in the state. This growing diversity will offer challenges to state and local governments in areas including education, housing, health, and criminal justice. The article includes a table of state population by county and racial or ethnic group and definitions of each racial or ethnic group.
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