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8 results for Women in politics
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Record #:
17635
Abstract:
The prominent women of North Carolina government are profiled. In 1961, four women held positions in the General Assembly; Mrs. Grace T. Rodenbough, Dr. Rachel D. Davis, II, Mrs. Tressie Pierce Fletcher, and Mrs. W. N. Cook. Mrs. Emil T. Chanlett was appointed to the Inter-American Commission of Women. Lastly, Mrs. Tillett of Charlotte was hand-picked by President Kennedy to the United Nations Commission on the Status of Women.
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Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 27 Issue 8, May 1961, p10, il
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Record #:
18171
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Orange County residents elected an all-female group of politicians to represent them in the N.C. General Assembly. These women include Senator Ellie Kinnaird, Representative Verla Insko, and Representative-elect Valerie Foushee and comprise the first all-female delegation representing Orange County. Despite success in Orange County, there are still only 39 women in the state legislature, that's just 23 percent.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 29 Issue 46, Nov 2012, p8, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
23335
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Madeleine McAulay uses social media and blog Faith, Hope, and Politics to discuss politics.
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Record #:
27747
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Abstract:
With Mitt Romney’s loss to Barack Obama, the influence of the white male vote and white male politicians is fading. The number of women in office is increasing and while that should indicate a change, in North Carolina, it hasn’t. The women in office in NC are just as conservative as their male counterparts. The sex of politics is changing, but not the points of view.
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Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 30 Issue 1, January 2013, p15-17 Periodical Website
Record #:
29277
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Elizabeth Hanford Dole of North Carolina is the assistant for public liaison in Ronald Reagan’s White House, former Federal Trade Commissioner, Harvard-educated lawyer, graduate and student body president of Duke University in 1958. This article covers her career in government and how she became the first woman named to a high level position in the new Reagan administration.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p20-23, por
Record #:
29278
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Elizabeth “Liddy” Hanford Dole has roots that stretch back through Duke and Durham to Salisbury, where her father, the late John V. Hanford, ran a florist shop. This article covers Elizabeth Dole’s childhood in North Carolina, and how she developed an interest in politics, eventually becoming one of the nation’s most prominent women.
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Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 9 Issue 2, Feb 1981, p24-25, por
Record #:
31549
Abstract:
This article examines how women in the workforce are influencing both men and women psychologically. Women legislators in North Carolina discuss their experiences working in the male-dominated political arena, and how attitudes may or may not be changing. Patricia Williams shares her own personal observations as a woman playing the non-traditional role of professional engineer.
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Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 11 Issue 5, May 1979, p16-20, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
31719
Author(s):
Abstract:
Mary Winfield is the first woman in North Carolina to be appointed to the State Board of Assessment, a National Democratic Committeewoman, a community leader, and the mother of four children. Winfield has been active in the women’s Equal Rights Movement, and her efforts are discussed in this article.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 4, Apr 1972, p14-15, por Periodical Website