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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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16 results for Storm water
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Record #:
15971
Author(s):
Abstract:
Much of the aesthetic, economic, and biological significance of the coastal zone is dependent on the maintenance of high water quality. However, many of the ways in which people enjoy and exploit coastal resources create disruptions in the natural system, jeopardizing the health of the coastal environment. Although storm water plays an important and indisputable role in declining water quality, it is an ambiguous culprit. Programs undertaken by the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) have implemented storm water regulations to manage coastal water quality.
Source:
Carolina Planning (NoCar HT 393 N8 C29x), Vol. 25 Issue 2, Summer 2000, p36-40
Full Text:
Record #:
25236
Author(s):
Abstract:
While the expected backlash from the pollution of Hurricane Floyd didn’t happen, scientists are still waiting for the other shoe to drop as the toxins are still sitting on the bottom of the river. The long-term effects of the Hurricane are still unknown.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 19 Issue 4, Fall 2000, p1, 10, il, por
Record #:
25304
Author(s):
Abstract:
Heather Jacobs defines stormwater and how a seemingly harmless word can mean big problems for North Carolina. However, she also describes solutions to prevent these potential problems.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 26 Issue 4, Fall 2007, p1-2
Record #:
25322
Author(s):
Abstract:
With a projected population increase in North Carolina comes a projected increase in development. This development should consider taking up several of the Low Impact Development ideas to prevent nonpoint pollution through stormwater.
Source:
Currents (NoCar TD 171.3 P3 P35x), Vol. 27 Issue 3, Fall 2008, p1-2
Record #:
33189
Author(s):
Abstract:
Recent permit requests for North Carolina coastal residential development, mostly duplexes and condominiums, have heightened conflicts between developers and shellfish producers. Rainfall runoff from high-density urban and resort developments can impact the quality and quantity of stormwater and frequently results in pollution of shellfish waters.
Record #:
33352
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Department of Natural Resources and Community Development has proposed new rules for storm water control. Storm water runoff from coastal development is a major problem because it contaminates fragile shellfish waters in North Carolina. This article discusses the issue and reviews the proposed rules.
Record #:
34186
Author(s):
Abstract:
In November, the Environmental Protection Agency promulgated final rules and regulations setting up the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES) stormwater permitting program. The scope of the program was expanded to include unincorporated urban areas with 100,000 or more population which have separate storm sewer systems. This change means that Cumberland County joins Charlotte, Raleigh, Durham, Greensboro, and Winston-Salem on the list of North Carolina urban areas that must comply with stormwater control programs.
Record #:
34266
Author(s):
Abstract:
Eighty-four more cities and urbanized counties in North Carolina and all construction sites larger than one acre will be required to get permits and manage storm water runoff under rules proposed by the United States Environmental Protection Agency in January. The Phase II Storm Water regulations will expand the national program to regulate storm water discharges as point sources under the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES).
Record #:
34271
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina’s Department of Transportation (DOT) obtained a stormwater permit to implement a statewide program to reduce the effects of highway runoff on surface waters. The permit was issued by the Division of Water Quality and requires the DOT to meet requirements for preventing water pollution.
Record #:
34293
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1998, North Carolina’s Department of Transportation (DOT) became the first to receive a state-issued statewide stormwater permit. Under the mandate of this permit, a research program was launched to provide needed information on pollutant loading from highway runoff on surface waters. DOT expects that within two years, it will have a database that will allow characterization of runoff from various kinds of highways across the state.
Record #:
34339
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Environmental Management Commission is struggling to design a program that will not involve direct mandate to counties but will still comply with requirements of the federal NPDES Stormwater Phase II program. In North Carolina, drainage systems along roadways in unincorporated areas are owned by the Department of Transportation. This type of ownership does not align with the language mandated by the United States Environmental Protection Agency, and consequently, has brought a legal challenge to implementing stormwater management programs.
Record #:
34343
Author(s):
Abstract:
In October, the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission adopted a temporary rule to implement a federally required program to control stormwater discharges to surface waters from publicly owned drainage systems in municipalities and urban areas meeting certain population criteria. The temporary state rule will allow regulated public entities identified under requirements of the federal NPDES Phase II stormwater rule to file applications for permits.
Record #:
34351
Author(s):
Abstract:
Following a meeting in September with the North Carolina Environmental Management Commission, commissioners question whether it would be a violation of the separation of powers provision of the North Carolina Constitution for the General Assembly to delegate veto power over executive branch rules to an independent commission that it appoints. Rejection by the Rules Review Commission of rules to implement the federal NPDES Stormwater Phase II program could set the stage for several challenges.
Record #:
34354
Author(s):
Abstract:
In North Carolina, where sanitary sewers are separate from sewers that carry stormwater, wastewater treatment capacity has not been a priority issue because only extreme rainfall events might threaten treatment capacity. A proposed Environmental Protection Agency policy would allow wastewater blending of primary and secondary treatments as long as permit limits are met. North Carolina does not currently have a blending policy, but may consider a policy that would recognize varying circumstances statewide.
Record #:
34353
Author(s):
Abstract:
On January 15, the North Carolina Rules Review Commission (RRC) met to consider revisions made by the Environmental Management Commission to the NPDES Stormwater Phase II rules in response to earlier rejections. After listening to special interest groups, the RRC passed a motion to disapprove rules in the stormwater program. However, it is still unknown which specifically which rules the motion applied to.