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7 results for Steamboats--North Carolina, Eastern--History
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Record #:
10774
Author(s):
Abstract:
According to Colonel C. Wingate Reed's BEAUFORT COUNTY: TWO CENTURIES OF ITS HISTORY, steamers first came to Washington, in Beaufort County, in 1847. Regular lines operated between Eastern North Carolina ports and destinations as far north as Norfolk and Baltimore. The Old Dominion Steamship Company ran regular service between Washington and Ocracoke while the Clyde Line ran ships between Washington and Norfolk. The steamers Amidas, R.L. Myers, and the Edgecombe were built specifically for river service between Washington, Greenville, and Tarboro.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 36 Issue 6, Aug 1968, p17, il
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Record #:
14925
Abstract:
Steamboating on the Tar River ran between Tarboro and Washington with stops between. Clyde and Old Dominion lines dominated the river trade. Some of the boats that navigated Tar River were Beaufort, Greenville, R.L. Myers, Margie, Shiloh, Tarboro, and Alpha, Beta. The trade boomed from the mid-19th century until 1923 when the last steamboat stopped in Tarboro.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 11 Issue 36, Feb 1944, p1, 21, il
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Record #:
21869
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This article examines the growth of steam navigation on North Carolina's water ways from the first monopoly granted in 1812 up to the Civil War. While competition from railroads were often the result of a failed venture, in the Cape Fear region steam lines thrived. This called for a series of improvements to the rivers of the state, as well as the construction of canals to further expedite commerce through river navigation.
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Record #:
22953
Author(s):
Abstract:
Images of steamboats have become synonymous with the south. From those described in Huckleberry Finn to modern gambling steamboats, they seem to fascinate everyone. However, few know that these ships have had an important history along the Tar River. The first ship on the Tar was a sidewheel called "Edmund D. McNair." It operated on the Tar from 1836 to 1839. By the 1870s, steamboats traversed the Tar River frequently. The Clyde Line, Old Dominion Line, and Shiloh Oil Mills companies all constructed or put boats on the Tar. Twenty-three different boats traveled up and down the Tar River until 1915, when the steamboat era ended.
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Record #:
23694
Author(s):
Abstract:
A tributary of the Neuse River, Contentnea Creek, called “Moccasin River,” divided Pitt and Greene Counties and the branch called Little Contentnea wanders through western Pitt County. It was Cicero M. A. Griffin (1828-1892) a merchant and mill man from Grifton, NC, who placed the first steamboat flat on the Contentnea Creek. The first steamboat was named “Contentnea.” Other steamboats on the Contentnea included the “Snow Hill,” “Robert E. Lee,” “Phillips,’ “Carolina,” “Blanche,” “Kinston,” “L. A. Cobb,” “Howard,” “Laura,” “Uncle Sam,” “Nellie W.,” “Pearlie May,” and “May Bell.”
Record #:
22875
Author(s):
Abstract:
During the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, steamboats piled the Tar River. The first ship to use the Tar River was a sidewheel called the "Edmund D. McNair." It operated on the Tar from 1836 until 1839. Other early steamboats were the Oregon, Amidas, Red Skull and the Gov. Morehead. By the 1870s, steamboats were quite common in the Tar River. The Clyde Line, Old Dominion Line, and Shiloh Oil Mills companies all constructed or put boats on the Tar. Twenty-three different boats traveled up and down the Tar River until 1915, when the railroad ended the steamboat era.
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Record #:
37299
Author(s):
Abstract:
Article about eating herrings and early history of the river. The tornado of Feb. 15, 1903 that sunk the Steamboat Olive is mentioned.