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6 results for Lifeguards--Outer Banks
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Record #:
7583
Abstract:
Baxter Miller entered the Life Saving Service in 1890 at the age of seventeen and retired after thirty years service in 1921. During his career he assisted in saving over 300 lives and was awarded two Congressional Medals of Honor for Lifesaving, the Gold Medal and a Silver Medal from the United States government, and a silver watch from the German government for helping in the rescue of their men from the BREWSTER.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p40-44, il, por
Record #:
7579
Abstract:
Ulysses S. “Lish” Midgett was born in Chicamacomico on Hatteras Island. At the age of 91, he is one of the last remaining surfmen of the original United States Lifesaving Service. In this SEA CHEST interview, Midgett recounts his years of service.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p20-21, por
Record #:
7585
Abstract:
The children of Urias Gaskins, Isaac Jennette, and Edward Midgett discuss the lives of their parents. Gaskins was the officer in charge of the Cape Hatteras Coast Guard Station at the time of his death. He received the Silver Medal of Honor for assisting in the rescue of the crew of the BREWSTER. Jennette spent his life in the Coast Guard and died while on duty. He also received the Silver Medal of Honor for assisting in the rescue of the crew of the BREWSTER. Midgett served twenty-eight years in the Life Saving Service and died at the age of eighty-three. He was a recipient of the Silver Medal of Honor for the BREWSTER incident.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p46-48, por
Record #:
7584
Abstract:
The German ship Brewster was one of the largest ships to go aground on Diamond Shoals. When the ship, carrying a crew of thirty-three, grounded on November 29, 1909, three lifesaving crews responded. It was impossible for the rescuers to board, because seas were breaking over the ship, yet they managed to rescue the entire crew. Eleven medals of honor were awarded to the rescuers in the incident.
Source:
Sea Chest (NoCar F 262 D2 S42), Vol. 4 Issue 2, Winter 1977, p45
Record #:
25054
Author(s):
Abstract:
Being a lifeguard at the Outer Banks is not as glamorous as Baywatch might make it appear to be. In fact the lifeguards, along with the Coast Guard, engage in rigorous training sessions on a regular basis.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Spring 2003, p12-15, il, por Periodical Website
Record #:
37700
Author(s):
Abstract:
Swimming vigil along shorelines with strong rip currents are the Outer Banks Rescue Guards. Noted are the standards that have to be fulfilled to become part of this lifesaving crew. Included are statistics attesting to the benefits of lifesavers and conditions making their job a necessity along North Carolina’s seashore.
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