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4 results for Gardens--Raleigh
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Record #:
7140
Author(s):
Abstract:
Television stations are busy workplaces. WRAL-TV5 in Raleigh is no exception. In 1958, the station's founder, A.J. Fletcher (1887-1979), started a three-quarter acre garden. Today the garden features seventy varieties of flowering and non-flowering plants, including ten hybrid azalea groups. Pittard discusses how this garden developed through the years and some of the ways it is used.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 11, Apr 2005, p144-148, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
27788
Author(s):
Abstract:
Raleigh’s City Council has approved a new provision that allows community gardens in some parts of the city to operate without a special-use permit. However, not all areas are covered and many want the provision expanded. The gardens brighten vacant lots, serve as community gathering places, and are a source of nutritious food to low-income areas.
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Record #:
30899
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hobbit Garden, a two-acre garden outside of Raleigh, is open to the public for tours of the garden’s rare and unusual ornamental plants. Gardeners Willie Pilkington and John Dilley describe the variety of plant species growing in the garden, and offer recommendations on garden design and plants native to North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 40 Issue 3, Mar 2008, p18-19, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
38287
Author(s):
Abstract:
Students attending the Governor Morehead School for the Blind experience a garden in Raleigh in a way many of its visitors do not. Inspired by Helen Keller, Martha Franck created a garden she intended to be experienced most fully through its smell, sound, and touch stimuli. Started in 1960 in Butner, it is in operation through a partnership between this school and the Garden Club of North Carolina.
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