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10 results for Forest conservation
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Record #:
1346
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Since a 1988 inventory revealed the precarious position of our maritime forests, North Carolina and such private concerns as the Nature Conservancy have made progress in assessing and protecting the remnants; yet hard choices lie ahead.
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Record #:
1347
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Eight maritime forests on North Carolina's barrier islands are especially important because of their ecological significance and their potential for preservation. These eight have been rated as high-priority sites for preservation efforts.
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Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Sept/Oct 1993, p9-10, map Periodical Website
Record #:
23666
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Hume Davenport, who founded SouthWings, flies his planes over the mountains of Southern Appalachia to take photographs of human impacts such as strip mining and clear cuts. Davenport hopes to raise awareness and win over public opinion on conversation issues.
Record #:
24086
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Dogwood Alliance is a non-profit organization that relies on big corporations to make commitments to protect forest areas in the South. The Alliance uses public pressure to foster corporate policies that favor forest protection.
Record #:
9977
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Megalos describes the North Carolina Forest Stewardship Program. The program is an innovative, multi-agency effort to assist private landowners in improving and protecting their forest resources.
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Record #:
169
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Old-growth forests in North Carolina can be found in the Great Smoky Mountains National Park, along the Blue Ridge Parkway, in the Nantahala National Forest, and in Pisgah National Forest.
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Record #:
23459
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Grigg T. Tyson (1854 - 1922) was a farmer near Ballard's Crossroads, and one of the first to advocate planting cover crops and saving the forests. He organized the Tyson - May Family reunion in 1920. Mrs. Grigg T. Tyson III donated narratives, maps, and other old papers of Grigg T. Tyson to the East Carolina Manuscript Collection, J.Y. Joyner Library, East Carolina University. This column is about Tyson's father, who orphaned when his entire family died from the typhoid fever.
Record #:
29720
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Eastern and Carolina hemlocks, which represent Appalachian culture, are also a keystone contributor to the mountain forest ecology. These hemlock forests are struggling to survive the invasive hemlock wooly adelgid, which feasts only on them. The Hemlock Restoration Initiative in Asheville, North Carolina is working with partners to restore hemlocks and long-term health.
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Record #:
30108
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A project has been launched to stimulate rebuilding of timber resources in the southern forests. As the country looks increasingly to the southern states for forest products, the federal government will provide funds for rebuilding and maintenance of the forests.
Record #:
30872
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American chestnut trees were plentiful in the Appalachian forest, until the chestnut blight disease caused a rapid, widespread die-off in the early part of the twentieth century. Farmers and volunteers in western North Carolina are working with the American Chestnut Foundation to plant, grow and re-establish chestnut trees in the state’s forests.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 41 Issue 12, Dec 2009, p14-15, il, por
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