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22 results for Economic forecasting
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Record #:
2287
Author(s):
Abstract:
Using figures from the U.S. Department of Commerce, the Employment Security Commission, and the N.C. Department of Revenue, Greenville economist Dr. James Kleckley, has projected growth rates for the state's 100 counties up to the year 2000.
Record #:
17940
Author(s):
Abstract:
A staff economist with the Committee on Manpower and Economic Development of the North Carolina Fund developed a predictive model of the state's economic welfare in the twenty-first century. The author looks to technological development in medicine, textiles, and transportation to sustain the future economy. Goals for attaining this economic stability are also presented.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 33 Issue 9, June 1967, p1-7, il
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Record #:
24324
Author(s):
Abstract:
The author presents what economists believe will happen in the next fifteen years in North Carolina.
Record #:
24789
Author(s):
Abstract:
In this North Carolina economic forecast round table, economy experts discuss their theories that the state’s economy will continue to grow and offer insights about what will fuel this growth.
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Full Text:
Record #:
27499
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has undergone an economic transformation over the last 20 years. Strip malls and jobs in the service industry have overtaken industrial jobs as the employers in the state. Many people have been forced to accept jobs that make them work longer hours for lower wages and fewer benefits. With the recession and the reduced cost of manufacturing outside the US, NC factories are cutting back more. A call to organize is being heard by many to try to protect the jobs that are left.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 8 Issue 42, October 17-23 1990, p11 Periodical Website
Record #:
27932
Author(s):
Abstract:
Former Duke University economics professor John Blackburn recently completed a study showing that wind and solar power combined could someday supply more than three-fourths of North Carolina’s electric power. Together, solar and wind power are highly reliable and inexpensive according to Blackburn. The utility companies disagree. The details Blackburn’s study and the position of the utility companies are explored.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 27 Issue 20, May 2010, p7-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
30263
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina has always had a strong commitment to our nation’s defense. This article discusses defense spending in North Carolina, economic implications of any military conflict, and the broader political and social implications of conflict in Iraq.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 86 Issue 3, Fall 2007, p15-16, por
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Record #:
30317
Author(s):
Abstract:
Economists for the North Carolina Bankers Association discuss the recession and predicted trends in economic growth for North Carolina, the United States, and around the world. Several topics included in the discussion are the housing sector, oil industries, entitlement programs, and employment.
Source:
Carolina Banker (HG 2153 N8 C66), Vol. 87 Issue 3, Fall 2008, p23, por
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Record #:
30494
Abstract:
Economic activity for 1986 in the Wilmington, North Carolina area continues to show growth over previous levels. A new index of local leading economic indicators (RILE) can forecast the direction of future regional economic activity in the Wilmington area.
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Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 2, July 1986, p8-12, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30500
Abstract:
In comparison to 1985, economic growth in the Wilmington, North Carolina area slowed to a moderate pace over 1986 of approximately five percent, its long-term historical trend. Forecasts predict that growth in 1987 will match that of 1986. At the national level, growth will slow in 1987 but, as of yet, there is no recession in sight.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 1, Jan 1987, p11-14, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30507
Abstract:
The year 1986 was a better than average year for the local economy. A mid-year review of local economic activity indicates that 1987 will be similar to 1986, and there is no immediate danger of a national recession. The dollar has continued to fall against other major currencies because of the uncertainty which has characterized United States trade policy.
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Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 5 Issue 2, July 1987, p11-14, bibl, f
Record #:
30584
Abstract:
The Wilmington, North Carolina area economy grew by approximately five percent over 1987. A mid-year review of local economic activity indicates that 1988 will be similar to 1987. At the national level, restrictive monetary policy enacted in 1987 will cause a slowdown in economic activity beginning in the second half of 1988 and continuing into 1989.
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Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 2, July 1988, p15-17, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30581
Abstract:
Economic activity in the Wilmington, North Carolina area has grown over the first three quarters of 1987, and growth in the six percent range is forecast for 1988. If the Federal Reserve System follows a moderately expansionary monetary policy, the national economy should grow by approximately three percent over 1988.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Jan 1988, p8-11, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30592
Abstract:
Over the first half of 1988, economic activity in the Wilmington, North Carolina area grew at an annual rate of twelve percent. Forecasted growth for this area in 1989 is predicted to be approximately nine percent. The national economy should grow during 1989, assuming that the Federal Reserve System does not restrict monetary growth.
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Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 1, Jan 1989, p16-18, il, bibl, f
Record #:
30597
Abstract:
The Wilmington, North Carolina area economy grew by approximately three percent over 1988. A mid-year review indicates that the local economy will grow by approximately six percent over 1989. At the national level, the inflation outlook is good and a recession appears very unlikely.
Source:
Carolina Coast Business Review (NoCar HF 5001 C38x), Vol. 7 Issue 2, July 1989, p12-15, il, bibl, f