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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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4 results for Duels
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Record #:
12320
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Abstract:
The custom of the duel continued with the colonists in America and eventually in North Carolina. Though forbidden legislature in 1802, duels persisted in North Carolina regularly until the end of the Civil War; then the practice dramatically declined. North Carolina's eighth governor and Constitution signer, Richard Dobbs Spaight, Sr., was killed in a duel with John Stanly over a political quarrel.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 41 Issue 6, Nov 1973, p10-14, il, por
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Record #:
19033
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Stanley-Spaight duel that occurred in New Bern in 1802 is an example of the culture of honor, and ultimately dueling, that occurred in the Antebellum south.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 7 Issue 4, Summer 2007, p3-4, il, bibl, f
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Record #:
19009
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It may seem like a current scandal but the heated exchange that led to a duel occurred over 200 years ago. In 1802, Richards Dobbs Spaight and John Stanley, Jr., two New Bern politicians, took their anger political party allegiance to a new level.
Source:
The Palace (NoCar F 264 N5 P3), Vol. 5 Issue 4, Summer 2005, p3, 14, f
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Record #:
29110
Author(s):
Abstract:
Samuel Carson and Robert Vance were two influential men in North Carolina politics during the 1820s. The two became rivals over the congressional seat in 1827. Carson challenged Vance to a duel, leading to Vance’s death.
Source:
Tar Heel (NoCar F 251 T37x), Vol. 6 Issue 1, Jan/Feb 1978, p13-16, il