NCPI Workmark
Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

Search Results


10 results for Convention facilities
Currently viewing results 1 - 10
PAGE OF 1
Record #:
1174
Author(s):
Abstract:
Finding appropriate facilities for conventions and conferences is a challenge for planning associates. Depending on the number of attendees, North Carolina has several sufficient venues for professional gatherings; beyond a certain number, though, North Carolina facilities are inadequate.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 51 Issue 8, Aug 1993, p56-59, 63-66
Subject(s):
Record #:
2510
Author(s):
Abstract:
Across the state nearly twenty large convention centers, plus hundreds of hotels and other properties offering spaces to meet, are generating large revenues. A listing of convention facilities by city and county is included in the article.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 53 Issue 9, Sept 1995, p24,26,28,30,32-34, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
3055
Author(s):
Abstract:
Convention and visitor bureaus represent regions, counties, or cities in attracting pleasure or business travelers to their areas and in helping to arrange accommodations. A resource directory is included.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Oct 1996, p15-18, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
3054
Author(s):
Abstract:
Convention facilities bring areas additional revenues and an opportunity to show off their communities. Projects for new centers or expansions are planned for Greenville, Hickory, Raleigh, and Cumberland County.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 54 Issue 10, Oct 1996, p12-14, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
5907
Abstract:
A number of cities are building convention centers to boost their local economies. Wiiliams-Tracy discusses some of these cities, including Greenville and Charlotte, that have opted for this approach.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 61 Issue 7, July 2003, p12-13, 17-21, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
7272
Author(s):
Abstract:
Business travel, especially trips to association meetings and corporate meetings, has returned to its pre-2001 levels. Competition among convention, conference centers, and halls to make their facilities attractive to travelers is highly competitive. Across the state, planners of meetings pull out all the stops to make business meetings both successful and fun, from high tech connections to team building games, to golf, waterfalls, and spas.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 63 Issue 7, July 2005, p12, 14-15, 17-22, il
Record #:
12172
Abstract:
Major conventions and business meetings generate over $17 billion into the economies of cities and towns across the country. In North Carolina similar meetings pump over $100 million a year into the state's economy. This article provides brief profiles of eighteen towns that have resources to support conventions and meetings, including Asheboro, Chapel Hill, Charlotte, Hickory, and High Point.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 41 Issue 8, Aug 1983, p16-19, 22-23, 39-40, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
12384
Author(s):
Abstract:
Meetings held by corporation off the business sites brought in $6.4 billion nationwide in 1983. While accurate figures are not available, the North Carolina Council of Conventions and Visitors Bureaus estimates that in 1981 conventions brought in over $100 million. This article provides alphabetically a listing of new or expanded convention facilities with a write-up briefly describing each.
Source:
We the People of North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 43 Issue 1, Jan 1985, p22, 24-25, 28-32, il
Record #:
29640
Author(s):
Abstract:
After years of planning, downtown Wilmington, North Carolina will be the home of river-front convention center. Funded entirely by the state's room occupancy tax, the development will be a meeting place for national, regional, and local visitors.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 12, Dec 2007, p34-35, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
29636
Author(s):
Abstract:
In eastern North Carolina, meeting places and convention centers are big business and the offerings are numerous for the region. For example, the New Bern Convention Center provides an economic impact of $12.5 million a year for the city and Craven County. But even without large convention centers, meetings places in the region are also thriving, from hotels to college halls.
Source:
NC Magazine (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 65 Issue 12, Dec 2007, p27-28, 30-32, por
Subject(s):