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Record #:
23450
Author(s):
Abstract:
James Berry and John Henry Whitehurst were born near Bethel in Pitt County on October 16, 1838. Their claim to fame revolves around their service in the Civil War. James Berry was in Missouri when the war broke out and quickly enlisted in the Confederate Army. Wounded and captured at Shiloh, James escaped captivity and re - enlisted in an Arkansas regiment. James was again captured at Tullahoma, TN in 1863 and held prisoner in Ohio until the end of the war. Returning to Pitt County after the war, he became a farmer and married Mary Elizabeth Manning in 1866. During the 1880s, James traveled across much of the United States. Mary died in 1894 and he married in Mary E. Whitehurst in 1897. At his death in 1928, James could count 12 children from both marriages.\r\nJohn Henry Whitehurst led a much simpler life than his twin brother. When the Civil War erupted, John was working for his future mother - in - law, Martha Carson, as a farm laborer. Enlisting in the 8th North Carolina, John was captured at Cold Harbor in 1864 and remained a prisoner until the end of the war. After the war, John returned home to farm in Carolina Township where he served as a Justice of the Peace. He married Zilphia Ann Carson and the couple had 10 children. John Henry died in 1919. The Whitehurst twins, who attended numerous Confederate reunions in Greenville, are believed to be the oldest surviving set of twins, Union or Confederate, who fought in the Civil War.\r\n
Subject(s):
Record #:
24430
Author(s):
Abstract:
This article discusses a public television documentary about the Sons of Confederate Veterans, the organization that was born in 1896 of the United Confederate Veterans. The organization hopes the documentary will help tell the truth about the Civil War.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 60 Issue 8, January 1993, p17-18, il
Full Text:
Record #:
24451
Author(s):
Abstract:
Though few observe it today, the Confederate Memorial Day on May 10 had a wide following. It was started in Raleigh after the war ended to honor the unreturned brave and decorate the graves of Confederate soldiers.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 58 Issue 12, May 1991, p12-13, il
Full Text:
Record #:
34495
Author(s):
Abstract:
Two local chapters of Sons of Confederate Veterans (SCV) were established in 1992 and 1993 to commemorate participation of Carteret County residents in the American Civil War. This article includes information of Carteret County Civil War veterans and current member activities.
Source:
The Researcher (NoCar F 262 C23 R47), Vol. 9 Issue 3, Summer 1993, p14-15, il, por