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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Art--Conservation and restoration
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Record #:
1561
Author(s):
Abstract:
Three paintings owned by the North Carolina Museum of Art are undergoing the restorative process.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Summer 1992, p14-16, il
Record #:
1569
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Museum of Art offers survey and treatment services to other not-for-profit agencies through its Outside Conservation Services program.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 1993, p26, il
Record #:
27601
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Caktus Group in Durham has upset area residents because it painted over Emily Weinstein’s famous Eno River Mural. The group was advised not to destroy the mural by the Historic Preservation Commision, but the group said it was necessary to restore the building to the way it looked in 1910. Caktus group has apologized and says it is scheduling a public meeting to hear ideas how it can fix the problem.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 31 Issue 29, July 2014, p8-9 Periodical Website
Record #:
27642
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Hayti mural at Heritage Square Shopping Square is deteriorating and will be costly to restore. Painted by Elizabeth Weinstein, the mural commemorates the historical African-American neighborhood. The plaza and mural will be demolished if a proposed development in the neighborhood is successful.
Source:
Record #:
29517
Author(s):
Abstract:
The painting Lady Mary Villiers, Later Duchess of Richmond and Lennox, with Charles Hamilton, Lord Arran (circa 1637) was recently restored by the Museum’s Conservation Lab. Flemish artist Anthony van Dyck’s portrait is considered a masterpiece, but suffered from discolored varnish, areas of retouching, and pentimenti. The cleaning and restoration process are described along with the quality and history of the painting.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Fall 2013, p22-23, il
Record #:
28883
Author(s):
Abstract:
David Goist, Chief Conservator of the North Carolina Museum of Art, explains what he and his staff do to maintain, treat and protect the museum’s collection. He also gives advice on how to care for art in private homes, emphasizing the importance of framing and lighting.
Source:
NC Arts (NoCar Oversize NX 1 N22x), Vol. 3 Issue 2, Feb 1987, p8-9, por
Record #:
29328
Author(s):
Abstract:
Claude Lorrain’s Pastoral Landscape with Huntsmen is the first work from an outside institution to receive conservation treatment as part of a new service made available by the Museum to other agencies. The painting from New Bern’s Tryon Palace underwent a three-month treatment procedure. The process for restoration and the Museum’s new service are detailed.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Summer 1985, p16-17
Record #:
29499
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dutch, Flemish Paintings Treated for Exhibition The Museum’s conservation staff have been performing conservation treatement on Dutch and Flemish paintings selected for display as part of the upcoming “Dutch Art in the Age of Rembrandt” exhibition this fall. These works immediately became top priority after the exhibition was scheduled. Originally treated in 1982, the conservators referred to that survey to guide them toward troublesome areas for each painting. The process of restoration is described in detail with the work on the painting The Dentist by Dutch artist Jan Miensz Molenaer is of particular focus.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Autumn 1986, p17-19
Record #:
29634
Author(s):
Abstract:
The most frequent question asked by children at the Museum’s educational sessions is how they get the art inside the building. The process for how art arrives at the Museum is detailed here. The moving of artwork is well-planned, well-controlled, and well-insured. Most art comes through the loading dock at the Museum and requires a team to oversee the process and art already at the Museum is transported from building-to-building via an underground tunnel.
Source:
Preview (NoCar Oversize N 715 R2 A26), Vol. Issue , Winter 2008, p15