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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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9 results for Apples
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Record #:
17767
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Every fall, people flock to a produce stand outside Hendersonville to take advantage of home grown apples offered by Mountain Fresh Orchard, only available during the three-month apple season.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 4, Sept 2012, p205-206, 208, 210, f Periodical Website
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Record #:
18951
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Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr. is an apple historian and retired orchardist who lives in Pittsboro. Gathered from the farmyards of North Carolina and other southern states, Calhoun has a nursery of heirloom apples growing on his property and has written the definitive book on the history of the fruit in the south.
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Record #:
9609
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People who choose agriculture as their livelihood are ever at the mercy of weather and market conditions. Percy Lowe Orchards, which has operated in its current location in Wilkes County since the 1930s, is an example of this. Kazaks recounts the history of this family business, now in its fourth generation, which has suffered a number of catastrophic crops disasters and other unanticipated challenges.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 75 Issue 6, Nov 2007, p94-96, 98, 100, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
6914
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Harley Prewitt's Apple Hill Orchard and Cider Mill in Morganton has been in the family for four generations. Each year the Prewitts harvest 2,000 trees that grow old favorites, like Red and Golden Delicious apples, and newer varieties, like Ginger Golds, Galas, and Pink Ladies. The orchard has also become a place for families to come for outings and old-fashioned fun. On Family Fun Days, held each Saturday, visitors can taste the cider, sample jams and jellies, and pick their own apples. Prewitt started giving to tours to schoolchildren in 1994, which educate the children about apple growing and local history.
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Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 72 Issue 5, Oct 2004, p84-86, 88, 90, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
3799
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Henderson County produces eighty percent of the state's apples. The Annual North Carolina Apple Festival, which started in 1938 in Hendersonville, marks the apple harvest. Visitors will find traditional events, including orchard tours and folk music, plus great food and a street fair where artists and craftsmen display their creations.
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Record #:
3796
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Preserving the overgrown Orchard at Altapass on the Blue Ridge Parkway near Spruce Pine is the goal of owners Bill and Judy Carson. To date half the orchard, about 2,000 trees, has been restored. Most are over eighty years old. Many are heritage apple tress, or varieties that have been lost or are hard to find.
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Record #:
9395
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Brushy Mountain apple grower Edith Bentley claims the apples from the Bentley homestead located at the foot of Sugarloaf have a distinct taste more appealing than apples from Virginia. She and her husband have been partners growing and selling apples and making cider since their marriage in 1932.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 42 Issue 9, Feb 1975, p23, il, por
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Record #:
31979
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Apples are the biggest fruit income crop in North Carolina, earning the state $10 million a year. North Carolina apples are mostly of four varieties, including the Rome Beauty, Stayman, Red Delicious, and Golden Delicious apples. This article discusses the apple growing industry and businesses in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 11, Nov 1972, p6-7, il, por
Record #:
11296
Author(s):
Abstract:
Cleta Bradshaw of Hudson discusses the process of turning dried apples into dolls.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 33 Issue 11, Nov 1965, p15, il, por
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