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8 results for Apples--Varieties
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Record #:
4866
Author(s):
Abstract:
In the early 1900s, 1,400 apple varieties were known to have existed in the South. Today, only a few hundred survive. A number of people, including Creighton Lee Calhoun are searching for these Southern apples before they are gone forever. On his Chatham County farm, Calhoun seeks to preserve this apple heritage by collecting cuttings of old varieties and growing them.
Source:
Independent Weekly (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57 [volumes 13 - 23 on microfilm]), Vol. 17 Issue 40, Oct 2000, p39, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
4951
Author(s):
Abstract:
Twenty years ago Edith and Creighton Calhoun bought land in Chatham County after retiring from the military. A chance conservation with a neighbor sparked a twenty-year search for old southern apples, or varieties dating back before 1928. Of the 1,600 varieties, only around 300 exist today. Calhoun collects cuttings of old varieties he finds to grow on his land to preserve the apple heritage. His book, Old Southern Apples, published in 1995, is the first comprehensive work on the subject.
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Record #:
5761
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time 1,600 different types of apples grew in North Carolina, but the number declined after the Civil War. In the late 1970s, Creighton Calhoun of Chatham County began a twenty-year search for old southern apples that date back before 1928. He collects cuttings of old varieties he finds to grow on his land. In the late 1990s, Horne Creek Living Historical Farm near Pinnacle, in collaboration with Calhoun, started planting historical apple trees. The farm is \"the only public collection of historical trees in the nation.\"
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 70 Issue 11, Apr 2003, p106-108, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
5981
Abstract:
In 1997, the Horne Creek Living Historical Farm in Surry County created the Southern Heritage Apple Orchard to preserve the varieties of the fruit which are rapidly disappearing. Today 650 trees are growing to maturity. The orchard is the only state-supported one in the country dedicated to preserving the old varieties of apples.
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Record #:
3641
Author(s):
Abstract:
At one time, over 1,300 varieties of apples grew throughout the Southeast. Today, only a few hundred survive. On his Chatham County farm, Creighton Lee Calhoun, Jr. seeks to preserve the apple heritage by collecting and growing over 350 varieties.
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Record #:
28525
Author(s):
Abstract:
Clemmons, NC resident Tom Brown is preserving heirloom apple trees once thought to be lost to time. Brown keeps the old varieties going by finding the original tree, taking cuttings, grafting his cuttings, and planting them in his preservation orchard. Brown has more than 1,000 trees in his orchard and discusses how he goes about finding unique varieties.
Record #:
22644
Author(s):
Abstract:
Tom Brown has driven over 250,000 miles across North Carolina, Georgia, Tennessee, Kentucky, and Virginia to identify and save from extinction over 1,000 varieties of heritage apples from the region.
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Record #:
31979
Author(s):
Abstract:
Apples are the biggest fruit income crop in North Carolina, earning the state $10 million a year. North Carolina apples are mostly of four varieties, including the Rome Beauty, Stayman, Red Delicious, and Golden Delicious apples. This article discusses the apple growing industry and businesses in North Carolina.
Source:
Carolina Country (NoCar HD 9688 N8 C38x), Vol. 4 Issue 11, Nov 1972, p6-7, il, por Periodical Website