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9 results for Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge
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Record #:
1399
Author(s):
Abstract:
Dare County's Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge is one of the last large pocosin tracts in North Carolina and home to several U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service projects, such as the re-introduction of the red wolf.
Source:
Coastwatch (NoCar QH 91 A1 N62x), Vol. Issue , Nov/Dec 1993, p3-7, il Periodical Website
Record #:
8130
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1980, the red wolf was declared extinct in the wild. Breeding programs conducted by the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service have brought the animal back. There are thirty-eight places in the United States that conduct captive breeding programs, but the only place in the world where red wolves roam in the wild is in eastern North Carolina on the 1.7-million acre Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. Daniel discusses the Red Wolf Howling Safari, a two-hour program conducted on Wednesday nights in the summer and on special nights the rest of the year. The wolves are never seen, but sometimes they will howl back at their human imitators.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 74 Issue 5, Oct 2006, p198-200, 202, 204, il Periodical Website
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Record #:
15198
Author(s):
Abstract:
There is a Pungee Indian legend that tells why the Lotus, the lovely, exotic flower of the water lily family blooms so profusely on the Alligator River near the Albemarle Sound in eastern North Carolina. Although this flower of thick, waxen petals is a thing of beauty, deep in the center lies a seed so poisonous that it is fatal to those who eat it. This seed was once the cruel and callous heart of Lotus, a lovely but wanton Indian maid.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 7 Issue 5, July 1939, p11, 20
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Record #:
23288
Author(s):
Abstract:
The Alligator River, which divides Tyrrell and Dare counties, is part of the Intercoastal Waterway and is important for its ecosystem and wildlife.
Record #:
26533
Author(s):
Abstract:
Chuck Peoples is a recent North Carolina State University graduate and volunteer with the U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service’s Red Wolf Project. He is using radio telemetry to track endangered red wolves that have been reintroduced in the wild at Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 37 Issue 4, July/Aug 1990, p8-9, il, por
Record #:
26617
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first record of a pup being born in the wild to red wolves was reported at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge. The pup has been observed at least six times since the first sighting on May 21.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 35 Issue 5, Sept/Oct 1988, p16, il
Record #:
26645
Author(s):
Abstract:
The first pair of red wolves were released on Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, near Manteo in North Carolina. Specially designed radio telemetry recapture collars were placed on the wolves to monitor their movement.
Source:
Friend of Wildlife (NoCar Oversize SK 431 F74x), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Nov/Dec 1987, p10, il
Record #:
718
Author(s):
Abstract:
As a result of a restoration project by the US Fish and Wildlife Service at the Alligator River National Wildlife Refuge, red wolves, an important part of North Carolina's wildlife heritage, are reappearing.
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Record #:
29204
Author(s):
Abstract:
With the help of the NC Nature Conservancy, US Fish and Wildlife, and money donated by the Prudential Insurance Co., Alligator River, 141,600 acres, is the third largest wildlife refuge east of the Mississippi River.
Source:
North Carolina (NoCar F 251 W4), Vol. 49 Issue 4, Apr 1991, p58