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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for "North Carolina--Authors"
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Record #:
22729
Abstract:
Jimmy Tomlin and Lee Smith are just two authors offering books with North Carolina related themes or settings.,
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Record #:
19839
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North Carolina has long been a haven to a host of writers from many different genres of literature, especially science fiction and fantasy. Authors such as Fred Chapelle, Orson Scott Card, Phillip Jose Farmer, and a multitude of listed science fiction and fantasy authors can claim the honor of being from or living in the state of North Carolina.
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Record #:
21119
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Charles Chesnutt's second novel, The Marrow of Tradition, published in 1901, is a fictional account of the 1898 Wilmington Race Riot. Chesnutt hoped that through his writing, he could enlighten other Americans, especially non-Southerners, to the problem of race plaguing America.
Record #:
21115
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Author Margaret Maron, early short story writer, has achieved her greatest success as an author of 10 novels including two mystery series: the Sigrid Harald novels and the Deborah Knott series. In this interview with NCLR, Maron discusses her writing career including how it began, where it has gone, where it is going to go, and how it connects to North Carolina.
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Record #:
21145
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New Bern writer Rose Goode McCullough received her first rejection letter in 1897 and at 108 years old she still recalls the poem that prompted it. Over the course of her long career, McCullough wrote extensively for the Progressive Farmer, published four books as well as a number of short stories and poems in newspapers and small magazines.
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Administration of Justice Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7908 .A15 U6), Vol. 1 Issue 2, 1993, p133-138, por
Record #:
21144
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Famed North Carolina author James Applewhite, discusses the trajectory of his career and how growing up in North Carolina has influenced how and what he writes.
Record #:
21130
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In this tribute to writer Randall Jarrell, North Carolina literary legend Fred Chappell provides background information and relates his first experience meeting Jarrell. Chappell discusses Jarrell's work and how it has affected the North Carolina's literary scene.
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Record #:
21398
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During 1980 and 1981, eight significant writers in North Carolina passed away. The list of the dearly departed include historian Hugh T. Lefler, newspapermen Harry Golden and Jonathan Daniels, literary critic Hugh Holman, poet laureate of North Carolina James L. Person, and literary writers Thad Stem, Paul Green, and Guy Owen. These giants of the written word have left their marks upon the literary landscape of North Carolina.
Record #:
21353
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Born and raised in Surry County, Hardin Edwards Taliaferro was a Baptist minister, writer, and editor of the 'South Western Baptist.' Within a three year period, he wrote a deeply religious book and a humorous one which won him acclaim as a regional literary humorist.
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Record #:
21291
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This article discusses the life and works of Charles Waddell Chesnutt, one of the leading black writers near the end of the 19th century. His work suffered in the 20th century as he failed to produce a significant piece of literature due to his difficulties in establishing a literary identity in either black or white literature.
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Record #:
21311
Abstract:
In his 1873 novel 'Sea Gift', author Edwin Wiley Fuller depicted student and city life in Chapel Hill, North Carolina between 1843 and 1868. In 'Sea Gift', Fuller examines love, dueling, pride, freshman hazing and the distinction between social classes in the book. Though viewed favorably by most reviewers, the book never received widespread accolade.
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Record #:
21267
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North Carolina author Peirson Ricks of Winston-Salem tragically committed suicide in April 1950. The author of three short stories, two hardcover books, and a book review, Ricks was discouraged by the failure of his novel 'The Hunter's Horn' and took his own life.