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107 results for "Folk music"
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Record #:
35277
Abstract:
The author briefly notes the acquisition of the song recorded in the rest of the article, “The Wayfaring Stranger.”
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Record #:
35287
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A brief introduction preludes the tune and lyrics for the ballad “What are Little Babies made of?”
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Record #:
35149
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The authors traveled around different places in the US, Mexico, and Europe collecting ballads.
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Record #:
35258
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The author seeks to call attention to the imbalance in the understanding of relations between English-Scottish ballads and Scandinavian folkeviser, and the relation those two have to the French romancero traditionnel or chanson populaire. This imbalance came about from romantic nationalism in the 19th century and the author references works done by Grundtvig and Child.
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Record #:
29010
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David Holt, a folk musician from Alamance County, North Carolina, plays the banjo, slide guitar, and bones. The bones are the actual rib bones from a cow, and an ancient rhythm instrument. History and context are important to Holt, as his music is a form of storytelling.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 14, April 2017, p21, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
16355
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Bascom Lamar Lunsford was called the \"Minstrel of the Appalachians.\" He performed, interpreted, and preserved the ballads, songs, string music, dances, and tales of this region at a time when they were growing less popular, and in doing so, helped bring them back into favor.
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Record #:
35888
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Teaching her children how to harmonize and encouraging their musical gifts, Landis contributed to musical life in churches, the black community, and the state of North Carolina.
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Record #:
1590
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Beverly Patterson has served as a folklife specialist in the Folklife Office of the North Carolina Arts Council. Her dissertation, \"The Sound of the Dove,\" will include extensive field research she conducted in NC communities in the area of folk music.
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Record #:
28964
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Dom Flemons, Kaia Kater, and Jerron “Blind Boy” Paxton are among a handful of people of color who are asserting their rightful place in folk, bluegrass, and old-time music. The three musicians recognize the centuries-long impact of racial discrimination in music. Their performance in Raleigh will spotlight the African roots of the banjo, and feature music and songs which use rhetoric as a way to break barriers and open minds.
Source:
Indy Week (NoCar Oversize AP 2 .I57), Vol. 34 Issue 6, Feb 2017, p16-17, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
36408
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Ralph Lewis was an amateur folk musician and his sons, Marty and Don, formed a band featuring their father. Their music is high-energy and based on a family-based collaboration of bluegrass tradition passed between two generations of the Lewis family.
Record #:
36332
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Reviewing the past nominations for the Jean Laney Harris Folk Heritage Award, the author spent time with some of the nominations, Jennings Chestnut and the Faulks. Chestnut is the owner of Chestnut Mandolin, a handmade string instrument store. Guy and Tina Faulk are folk musicians and the owners of Guy and Tina’s Bluegrass Pickin’ Parlor, a hub for local bluegrass music.
Record #:
36502
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JC Kemp represents the large scale musical transformation that took place during the 1950s in the central Appalachians. He combined old time fiddle music and gospel singing, contributing to the bluegrass sound.
Record #:
30164
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The sixth annual Brevard Music Festival occurred in August and featured concert programming, lectures, and folk music from an array of talents. Located at the Transylvania Music Camp in western north Carolina, the Festival featured national known singers and folklorists, as well as music from the 150 young musicians who study at the Camp.
Record #:
35662
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Commonly known by children, even those who never went to a summer camp, camp songs are widely known across far distances and only vary slightly.
Record #:
38263
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The Old North State was on the mind of a nineteen year old songwriter, who penned “Carolina On My Mind” as tribute to his home state. As the author illustrates, this state’s lifeways and the more famous re-recording of the song is on the minds of many citizens other than James Taylor.
Source:
Our State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 80 Issue 2, July 2012, p164-166, 168 Periodical Website