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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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5 results for Wilburn, Hiram C
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Record #:
18710
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During the colonial period, the British attempted to maintain friendly relations with the Cherokees in the international struggle for American soil. In an attempt to move cooperatively against a common enemy, southern colonies, including North Carolina were authorized to devastate the Cherokee nation in all settlements. This article describes this destructive expedition and bearing on the immediate Cherokee in the vicinity of the town of Nununyi.
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Record #:
18708
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Wilburn discusses the changes that have occurred in Jackson County, an area where Cherokees from the neighboring state of Tennessee came for refuge from mineral prospectors through the Blue Ridge Mountains.
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Record #:
29103
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This article is meant as a follow-up to the “Judaculla Rock” article by Hiram C. Wilburn in Southern Indian Studies, Volume 4, pages 19-21. The article addresses the geographical locations of Judaculla Rock and other natural features and tries to explain the meanings of these natural features and objects. These natural features and objects are related to the Cherokee mythical creature or character Judaculla. The mythology of the Judaculla is also explained.
Record #:
29102
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The author attempts to explain Judaculla Rock and its petroglyphs. The rock is believed to be of Cherokee origin and is located in Cullowhee, Jackson County, North Carolina. An explanation of the mythical Cherokee character Judaculla or Tsul-ka-lu is first described. The author then follows by explaining that he believes the rock is a picture-map of the battle of Tal-i-wa fought in 1755. Evidence for his theory is provided.
Record #:
31597
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The Cherokee became of interest to the British as they were in key positions to help halt the push of the Spanish up from Florida. This article tracks their relationship with the State of North Carolina since that time.
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