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16 results for Warren, David G
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Record #:
26280
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state Emergency Medical Services system has completed their first year of operation. Accomplishments include and established legal basis, personnel recruitment, budget preparation, internal organization, program development, testing of administrative mechanisms, new agency relationships, training and technical services.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 42, June 1974, p1-4, f
Record #:
26284
Author(s):
Abstract:
Control of public health nuisances is becoming a more demanding task. The Institute of Government conducted a survey of local health departments to determine the extent of activity in dealing with nuisances and other environmental problems. The study concluded that there seems to be no uniformity of enforcement and most counties report little use of their public nuisance powers.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 38, Dec 1973, p1-8, f
Record #:
26281
Author(s):
Abstract:
The University of North Carolina Board of Governors received funds to develop a new residency program for graduate training in family practice, internal medicine, pediatrics, and obstetrics/gynecology. Residency positions will be at Area Health Education Centers in larger community hospitals, which will also provide continuing education for nursing and other health professions.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 41, Apr 1974, p1-8, f
Record #:
26279
Author(s):
Abstract:
The legal recognition of midwifery in North Carolina is in a state of transition. There is currently no legal basis for the training and utilization of nurse-midwives, nor has society expressed the need for promoting their development.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 43, Aug 1974, p1-4, f
Record #:
26278
Author(s):
Abstract:
Physician’s assistants and nurse practitioners are new types of medical care specialists. Debate over the legitimacy of these two professions was resolved by legal comparisons and definitions of their roles in health services.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 44, Oct 1974, p1-4, f
Record #:
26282
Author(s):
Abstract:
Several significant statutes were enacted to enhance the ability of local health departments to protect and advance public health. Among these are new provisions to revise composition of local boards of health, establish state standards for public health services, and increase state financial support.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 40, Feb 1974, p1-4, f
Record #:
26283
Author(s):
Abstract:
Significant new powers and responsibilities relating to septic tank control were given to North Carolina local health departments in the Ground Absorption Sewage Disposal System Act of 1973. The new statute sets out a permits procedure that carries a maximum fine of $200 for violation.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 39, Jan 1974, p1-3, f
Record #:
26293
Author(s):
Abstract:
The severe shortage of health manpower in North Carolina presents a massive problem threatening to overwhelm existing emergency resources. There is also potential liability of hospitals and physicians, either for negligent or inadequate emergency room treatment or for refusing to accept one who seeks emergency aid.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 29, Jan 1972, p1-4, f
Record #:
26286
Author(s):
Abstract:
Good Samaritan laws are questionable statutes because it is unclear whether they have achieved their purpose or were even needed in the first place. A solution is to develop an extensive and effective rescue and emergency medical assistance program within every governmental jurisdiction.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 36, Dec 1972, p1-4, f
Record #:
26288
Author(s):
Abstract:
An increasing factor in medical malpractice lawsuits is the after-the-fact conclusion that the physician did not obtain informed consent or disclose information to the patient. If carefully designed, the hospital consent form could serve as a valuable check on the patient’s understanding of medical procedures.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 34, June 1972, p1-4, f
Record #:
26292
Author(s):
Abstract:
States impose regulatory measures that restrict individual freedom in the name of public health. North Carolina requires compulsory examinations of and immunizations for communicable diseases, but for the most part, people accept these measures.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 30, Feb 1972, p1-3, f
Record #:
26291
Author(s):
Abstract:
North Carolina is facing a shortage in primary medical care. In response, programs are being developed to increase the productivity of physicians delivering primary care by using a helper, who is specifically trained as a physician’s assistant.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 31, Mar 1972, p1-5, f
Record #:
26289
Author(s):
Abstract:
The practice of midwifery has steadily declined as modern health care has advanced. However, high infant mortality and an increasing shortage of physicians are reasons to advocate the return of nurse-midwives as a solution to these problems.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 33, May 1972, p1-4, f
Record #:
26287
Author(s):
Abstract:
New attempts to define death are put in terms of an irreversible condition of unconsciousness, a condition in which the brain is unable to resume normal functioning. This is called cerebral death or brain death.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 35, July 1972, p1-4, f
Record #:
26290
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1961, the Supreme Court of North Carolina declared a suicide attempt to be an indictable misdemeanor. This decision was made based on common law but ignores sociological, psychological, and emotional factors.
Source:
Health Law Bulletin (NoCar KFN 7754 A1 H42x), Vol. Issue 32, Apr 1972, p1-4, f
Subject(s):