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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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13 results for Warre, David G
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Record #:
17889
Author(s):
Abstract:
The state's health directors met to discuss topics of developing public health concerns like immunizations, pollution, and urbanization. This meeting was one in a series formally recognized as the North Carolina Conference of Health Directors and began with the first meeting in 1963. Conference goals were to assemble the state's public health experts to inform legislation and advise the State Board of Health.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 32 Issue 7, Apr 1966, p9-10, il
Subject(s):
Record #:
17913
Author(s):
Abstract:
An historical account of air pollution and legislation to curb pollution on a national level frames the conversation concerning the state's current problems and legislation on this matter. Many laws targeted congested areas like cities where people were more likely to feel the effects of pollution. First recognition of the problem happened in the 1963 General Assembly when the State Air Hygiene Program Act passed.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 33 Issue 5, Feb 1967, p1-6, il
Record #:
17986
Author(s):
Abstract:
Health legislation enacted in the 1969 North Carolina General Assembly cut across a number of state agencies and affected the practice of several health professions. Measures included increased medical assistance to the needy, financial assistance to two private medical schools in the state, and the education and certification of nurses.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 36 Issue 2, Oct 1969, p14-19
Record #:
18001
Author(s):
Abstract:
Parking throughout the state's cities in the mid-20th-century created a problem as urban areas expanded. Legal statutes were often unclear and this article attempts to clarify official laws governing municipal parking. It does not include information on curb or off-street parking.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 34 Issue 4, Dec 1967, p23-25
Record #:
18034
Author(s):
Abstract:
By their very nature, regulations that protect society in general usually inhibit the personal freedom of people as individual citizens. Public health practices are at the forefront of this relationship. For example, North Carolina requires compulsory examination for venereal disease of applicants for a marriage license and inmates in jails.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 37 Issue 3, Nov 1970, p15-17
Record #:
18030
Author(s):
Abstract:
The concept of hospital emergency room care has changed drastically in recent years, with a tremendous increase in the volume of patients in North Carolina emergency rooms. Thus, legal responsibility and liability of these institutions are brought into question.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 37 Issue 2, Oct 1970, p1-4, 15
Record #:
18064
Author(s):
Abstract:
The practice of midwifery is old, and given shortages of doctors the growth of the practice is thought to be on the up. This article examines the use of nurse-midwives as a solution to obstetrical problems in North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 37 Issue 9, June 1971, p17-20
Subject(s):
Record #:
18076
Author(s):
Abstract:
A growing problem is the threat of aural pollution. The explosion of both population and technological society has increased the noise level across the country. In North Carolina there are some legal tools that can be used to combat noise pollution.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 2, Oct 1971, p16-19
Record #:
18073
Author(s):
Abstract:
Legislation in the 1971 North Carolina General Assembly focused on the appropriations for state health agencies and special programs, special funding for health education, and regulations over home health agencies.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 1, Sept 1971, p74-77
Record #:
18082
Author(s):
Abstract:
Today, combating environmental pollution is popular; however, one of the side effects of pollution, noxious odor, has received little attention. Warren discusses the legal actions that can be taken to combat offensive odors in North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 4, Dec 1971, p1-2, 14, il, bibl
Record #:
18078
Author(s):
Abstract:
In 1963, the American Medical Association recognized the growing threat of medical malpractice and malpractice litigation. Teague and Warren discuss the malpractice problem in general and its implications for North Carolina.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 3, Nov 1971, p8-10
Subject(s):
Record #:
18091
Author(s):
Abstract:
Given shortages of availability and quality of health care for many in North Carolina, the state has attempted to improve the situation with medical schools and health departments. Additionally, new training in physician's assistants takes the added stress of peripheral tasks off doctors' hands.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 38 Issue 5, Feb 1972, p13-17
Record #:
18143
Author(s):
Abstract:
The past several years have seen a flurry of health legislation in the United States. Among these laws, the Good Samaritan law has been one of the most topical. This article examines the Good Samaritan Law in North Carolina, and the need for better emergency medical services.
Source:
Popular Government (NoCar JK 4101 P6), Vol. 39 Issue 6, Mar 1973, p19-21