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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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7 results for Shaffner, Marty
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Record #:
14325
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Shaffner discusses four fly-fishing guides in NC who have become legendary in their own time: William \"Bo\" Cash; Kevin Howell; Roger Lowe; and Oliver \"Ollie\" Smith.
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Record #:
22385
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Shaffner recounts the creation of the jerkbait and describes using this popular fishing lure.
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Record #:
25517
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When fly-fishing in North Carolina and deciding the right fly to tie on, there are a few factors to consider. Beginning anglers should focus on matching imitation flies to real-life sporadic insect hatches, current insect patterns, and the stream conditions. Most importantly, if the fly is not catching fish, do not be afraid to change it.
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Record #:
13865
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Shaffner discusses the many opportunities and types of trout fishing in North Carolina, including one of the most overlooked - fishing in streams within the city limits.
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Record #:
27391
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Shaffner talks about his return to fly-fishing for trout on the Cherokee reservation in western North Carolina, where he fished when he was a boy, and good places to fish on the land. Also, the new catch-and release program is explained, as well as the benefits of the program.
Record #:
21733
Abstract:
Shaffner, a fishing guide in northwestern North Carolina, describes fishing for smallmouth bass in a very under-utilized fishery--the tributaries of large smallmouth bass rivers. He considers it the state's greatest freshwater game fish. He provides information on some of the streams listed by their river basins, such as the Yadkin River, New River, and French Broad River basins, as well as tackle and techniques to use.
Record #:
28438
Abstract:
For years, forty yards was the limit most hunters imposed on themselves for shooting at a wild turkey. Advancements in ammunition shells and chokes allow North Carolina turkey hunters to take aim from farther away than before.
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