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47 results for Moore, Louis T
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Record #:
13617
Author(s):
Abstract:
It seems to be generally agreed that the first North Carolina daily was the Wilmington Daily Journal, published by Alfred Lanier Price, and that its first issued came out on September 8, 1851.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 12, Aug 1951, p3, 23
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Record #:
13615
Author(s):
Abstract:
There were only eleven states in the Confederacy but the Confederate flag had 13 stars.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 19 Issue 12, Aug 1951, p4
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Record #:
13894
Author(s):
Abstract:
This Bible was stolen from the Presbyterian Church in Wilmington during the closing days of the Civil War. It was kept in possession of a Union soldier for 63 years until it was finally returned.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 3, June 1950, p6
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Record #:
13978
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Abstract:
For more than twenty-five years, thanks to Carl B. Rehder, one of Wilmington's most public-spirited citizens, and thousands of school children in New Hanover County, there have been tons of vegetables produced.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 18 Issue 37, Feb 1951, p7
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Record #:
14073
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Mary Slocumb ran to her husband in battle after believing she dreamed he cried out for her. At the Battle of Moore's Creek Bridge during the Revolutionary War, Colonel Slocumb was engaged with British troops. His wife Mary believed she heard him call to her while she slept and decided to make a daring run to Moore's Creek from Goldsboro a sixty mile journey. Most of the article is a reprint of Mary Slocumb's own description of events, ending with the author mentioning the internment of Colonel Slocumb and his wife at Moore's Creek National Park.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 1, June 1948, p41-42, il
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Record #:
14077
Author(s):
Abstract:
Carolina Yacht Club was the second oldest boating organization along the East Coast and founded in 1853. The article further discusses the development of the club including founding members, the club's perseverance through the Civil War, Spanish American War, and the two World Wars. Sailing, as well as social events and other recreational activities are mentioned.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 2, June 1948, p3-4, il
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Record #:
14148
Author(s):
Abstract:
The North Carolina Symphony Orchestra is doing great work and is appreciated from all sections of the state.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 17 Issue 24, Nov 1949, p6-7, 18, f
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Record #:
14227
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Abstract:
In this article, the author introduces readers to a devout man of the cloth, as well as a devote man to the South. Reverend A. A. Watson, of Wilmington, showed his loyalties to the Southern cause when he refused to cease praying to Confederate President Jefferson Davis. Union forces had occupied Wilmington beginning January 15, 1865 after the fall of Fort Fisher. Though defeated militarily, a few staunch Southern supporters still showed their faithfulness to the South by denying Abraham Lincoln's presidency.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 16 Issue 12, Aug 1948, p6, 22
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Record #:
14338
Author(s):
Abstract:
The development of trade, navigation and general commerce in North Carolina during the days of the Lords Proprietors (1665-1730) represents an interesting and important chapter in the development of the colony, the beneficial effects of which are felt in business circles of today.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 8, July 1947, p11,18
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Record #:
14334
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Abstract:
Thomas \"Stonewall\" Jackson fell in love with a young lady who lived in Lincoln County, and he did most of his courting while a guest at her home.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 8, July 1947, p3,29, il
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Record #:
14407
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King George III and King George VI have something in common: they were both embarrassed by women. The first of the two created quite a stir in North Carolina a long time ago.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 16, Sept 1947, p21
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Record #:
14429
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Abstract:
The Freedom Train is a traveling shrine of Liberty, carrying directly to the American people 128 documents from which our government of free people has been evolved; records constituting the most precious pieces history. The Train will make five stops in North Carolina during the course of its tour through the 48 states.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 24, Nov 1947, p8, 27-28
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Record #:
14460
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Abstract:
The story of the schooner Berwind is the scene of the bloodiest mutiny and murders of modern times on the high seas. The crime resulted in the death of the captain, three other officers and a seaman. The slaughter of the quintet occurred off the coast of North Carolina, and the death ship brought Henry Scott, Arthur Adams, and Robert Sawyer to Southport in chains.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 37, Feb 1948, p6-7, f
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Record #:
14463
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Abstract:
There are different versions in connection with the naming of Lockwood's Folly in Brunswick County, and there is an interesting story in connection with each version.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 38, Feb 1948, p11, 18, f
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Record #:
14478
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Abstract:
Many interesting and dramatic events occurred during the lifetime of Governor Benjamin Smith, and even after his death his body was not permitted to rest in peace.
Source:
The State (NoCar F 251 S77), Vol. 15 Issue 46, Apr 1948, p11, 20
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