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Articles in regional publications that pertain to a wide range of North Carolina-related topics.

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11 results for Hester, F. Eugene
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Record #:
6972
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The prothonotary warbler, a brilliantly colored orange-yellow bird with a distinctive song, summers among the state's coastal woodlands, swamps, and rivers, before returning to Central and South America. This bird nests in cavities in small trees in swamps and wet woodlands. Hester describes how to make a warbler house and how the warbler builds its nest and feeds its young.
Record #:
8356
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Woodcocks are unusual game birds, having short legs, pot bellies, large eyes, and long bills. They are actually seabirds that prefers to live in wet woodlands rather than along the seashore. Woodcocks migrate southward in the winter and spend the season in North Carolina and other southeastern states. The best places to look for the bird when hunting are young forest areas on poorly drained land and in alder thickets.
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Record #:
7976
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There are at least twenty-four species of sunfish found in the state, including redear, bluegill, redbreast, warmouth, and pumpkinseed. Hester describes the fish; live or artificial bait; and equipment. A fly rod is one of the best fishing rods for catching sunfish on ponds and lakes.
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Record #:
2358
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The bowfin, also called blackfish and dogfish, is a popular fighting game fish that has existed since the time of the dinosaurs. The state record bowfin, caught in Lake Wylie, weighed 17 pounds, 3 ounces.
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Record #:
5151
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Beavers remake the environment to meet their needs. What's good for the beaver, though, sometimes causes problems for people, such as destruction of trees and crops and flooding caused by beaver dams. On the positive side, beaver ponds provide homes for waterfowl and habitats for other species including frogs and bitterns. The dams also help prevent harmful nutrients and pollutants from washing downstream by causing them to settle to the pond bottoms where bacteria destroy them.
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Record #:
5041
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Although people who fish have a large supply of lures in their tackle boxes, they usually find one that proves highly effective when bass fishing. Five anglers discuss their favorite lures and how they use them, including the Silver Spoon with Trailer, the Long Plastic Worm, and the Stickbait with Propellers.
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Record #:
7407
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Twelve doves is the day limit for dove hunters. Attracting a good number of the birds to a field so hunters can bag their limit requires preparation in advance. Hester discusses this advance planning with hunters and farmers in Rowan, Wake, and Johnston Counties, and two North Carolina Wildlife Resources Commission biologists. Among the methods are careful planting and management of crops that are attractive to doves.
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Record #:
8232
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Migratory waterfowl have wintered in North Carolina over the centuries. Following some mysterious, invisible pathway through the sky, the birds fly in from the Dakotas, Canada, and far beyond the Artic Circle. Hester describes some of these autumnal visitors, including the mallard, wood duck, northern pintail, American wigeon, and tundra swan.
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Record #:
10789
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Feeding birds during the winter months provides them with needed nourishment and gives the provider many pleasurable moments of bird watching.
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Record #:
16930
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The American crow--is it a villain who feasts on cornfields or steals eggs from the nests of other birds. Or does this intelligent, adaptable bird have a more friendly side. Hester examines how attitudes toward this bird have changed over time.
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Record #:
36164
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A physically and economically feasible solution for the decrease of forests: bird boxes. Among the species that could make this structure for the birds were bluebirds and Carolina wrens.