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11 results for Cornell, J.H
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Record #:
8416
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The walleye was first reported in North Carolina in 1869 in the French Broad River, and over the years it has become an important game fish in the state. Fishermen like it because it readily strikes artificial lures and is among the finest of freshwater fishes in flavor. The walleye did not get its name by accident; their eyes are very large in comparison to the eyes of other fishes. Cornell discusses the walleye's habitat, game management, and importance to sports fishermen.
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Record #:
9365
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The yellow perch, also known as the raccoon fish or ringed perch, can reach a size of almost twelve inches and weigh about a pound. Cornell discusses the perch's coloration, habitat, life history, and importance as a game fish.
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Record #:
6634
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The striped bass is to the fishermen of the coast what the trout is to the mountain stream angler - a worthy opponent. The fish once lived in coastal rivers, including the Roanoke, in tremendous numbers. However, water pollution and exploitation of natural resources have reduced it to a fraction of its former abundance. Cornell discusses its habitat and life history and importance to commercial and sport fishermen.
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Record #:
6632
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The weakfish is one of North Carolina's important game fishes in the salt and brackish waters of the coastal sounds and rivers. When it is hooked on a light tackle, there is nothing “weak” about the fighting ability of this fish. Cornell discusses the habitat and life history of the weakfish and its importance to fishermen.
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Record #:
6633
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The common or white sucker is the most generally distributed of all the suckers in the state. It is taken by commercial fishermen in the lower Neuse River, and it is caught consistently in the Yadkin River and smaller streams in the piedmont. Cornell discusses the habitat and life history of the white sucker and its importance to fishermen.
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Record #:
8102
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The brook trout is the state's only native mountain trout. The rainbow and brown trout are introduced species. The brook trout prefers fast-flowing mountains streams with an average water temperature of about fifty degrees. At one time brook trout were abundant in larger mountain streams, but the intrusion of farming and logging has driven the trout out. Now the only suitable natural habitat for brook trout is in the smallest streams found at higher elevations. Cornell discusses the brook trout's life history and its importance as a game fish.
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Record #:
8527
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While the gizzard shad may seldom take a fisherman's hook, it is most desirable as a forage fish for game species. It is known by a variety of local names, such as skipjack and mud shad, but the name gizzard shad is more commonly accepted. It lives its life entirely in fresh water. This species usually reaches a length of twelve inches and is silvery in color and bluish above. Cornell discusses the gizzard shad's habitat and life history.
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Record #:
8883
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The brown trout is an introduced species in North Carolina's streams and rivers. Cornell discusses its habitat, life history, and importance as a game fish.
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Record #:
8925
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Many fishermen consider the smallmouth bass to be the most desirable freshwater game fish. Its vertical bars along its sides and distinct eye stripes differ from the largemouth bass which has a blotchy, horizontal stripe down its side. Cornell discusses the smallmouth's habitat, life history, and importance as a game fish.
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Record #:
8885
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Cornell discusses the rainbow trout's life history, habitat, importance as a game fish, and why there is no such thing as a typical rainbow trout.
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Record #:
37896
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North Carolina boasts over 2.25 million acres of inland waters, including streams, rivers, lakes, ponds, and more. Fishing, as a sport or recreation, is one of the most popular pastimes in the state. A system of stocking fish, surveys, and conservation keeps the fisher people happy and the fish stocked.