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35 results for "Nathe, Margarite"
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Record #:
25876
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Shanny Luft, a doctoral student of religious studies, focuses his research on evangelical attitudes toward Hollywood and the mainstream film industry. According to Luft, evangelicals are part of a liberal religious movement that has found ways to market their beliefs through clothing, tattoos, and various forms of media.
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Record #:
25883
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The first real descriptions of shamans in Russian Siberia were written by seventeenth century mapmakers, who described how shamans transformed into women. According to anthropologist Silvia Tomaskova, this information implies that both men and women could have been shaman leaders.
Source:
Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 23 Issue 3, Spring 2007, p40-43, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25832
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James Coleman is a UNC professor of African American literature. His latest work on contemporary African American fiction grew from his own spiritual development, experiences with Christianity, and hoodoo influences.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p26-27, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25829
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Cynthia Bulik and her colleagues are trying to find which genes affect one’s likelihood of developing anorexia. According to their research, both genes and environmental factors can lead people to develop anorexia.
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Endeavors (NoCar LD 3941.3 A3), Vol. 23 Issue 1, Fall 2006, p17-20, il, por Periodical Website
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Record #:
25901
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Chrysography is a technique employed by early Christian scribes who used gold ink to copy the Gospels of the Bible. Chrysography became a crucial element in Crusader icon paintings, but little is known about why it was used. Jaroslav Folda, a professor of art history, believes it provides insight into differing developments in medieval and Renaissance art.
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